Table of Content

 

 

 

 

SCIBRS

GUIDE/TRAINING MANUAL

 

 

Requirements for participating in the S.C. Incident Based Reporting System

and

A guide to understanding and using SCIBRS definitions and data elements

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 


SECTION 1 - REPORTING RULES
                Common Terms                                    		1-1
                Incident-Based Reporting                        		1-2
                SCIBRS Reports                                  		1-5
                Counting Methodology                            		1-5
                Jurisdictional Reporting                        		1-6
                General Requirements                            		1-8

SECTION 2 - GROUP A CRIME DEFINITIONS A-C
               UCR/NIBRS Definitions vs Statutes		2-1
               Automated Conversion not allowed		2-2
               Offense Definition (A-C)                         		2-3

SECTION 3 - GROUP A CRIME DEFINITIONS D-G
               Offense Definitions (D-G)                        		3-1

SECTION 4 - GROUP A CRIME DEFINITIONS H-P
               Offense Definitions (H-P)                        		4-1

SECTION 5 - GROUP A CRIME DEFINITIONS Q-Z
               Offense Definitions (Q-Z)                        		5-1

SECTION 6 - GROUP B CRIME DEFINITIONS
               Offense Definition               			6-1

SECTION 7 - DATA SUBMISSION
               SCIBRS Data Submissions              		7-1
               Window Records                                   		7-2
               Data Sets                                        		7-4
               Administrative Data                              		7-4
               Offense Data                                     		7-4
               Property Data                                    		7-4
               Victim Data                                      		7-4
               Offender Data                                    		7-4
               Arrestee Data (Group A only)                     		7-5
               Group B Arrestee Data                            		7-5
               Definition of "Incident"                         		7-6
               Classifying Offenses                             		7-7
               Counting Methodology                             		7-8
               SCIBRS Offense Codes                             		7-9
               Group B Offense Codes                           		7-11

SECTION 8 - ADMINISTRATIVE DATA
              Window Records                                   		8-2
              ORI                                              		8-3
              Case Number                                      		8-3
              Date                                             		8-3
              Time                                             		8-3
              Report Date Indicator ("R")                      		8-4
              Exceptionally Cleared                            		8-4
              Case Status (S.C. only)                          		8-6

SECTION 9 - OFFENSE DATA
             Multiple Offenses                                 		9-1
             Offense Code                                      		9-1
             Attempted-Completed                               		9-2
             Offender using (Alcohol,Drugs,Computer)		9-2
             Victim using (Alcohol,Drugs)                      		9-3
             Bias (Hate) Motivation                            		9-3
             Location/Premise                                  		9-4
             Units Entered                                     		9-6
             Method of Entry                                   		9-7
             Type Criminal Activity                            		9-8
             Gang Violence                                     		9-9
             Weapon/Force                                      		9-10
             Special Circumstances (Additional Subcodes)		9-12

SECTION 10 - PROPERTY DATA AND DRUG DATA
             Type Property Loss/etc.                          		10-1
             Property Description                             		10-2
             Value of Property                                		10-5
             Date Recovere                                    		10-6
             Number of Motor Vehicles Stolen                  		10-7
             Number of Motor Vehicles Recovered		10-7
             Drug Data                                        		10-8
             Drug Type                                        		10-9
             Drug Quantity                                    		10-10
             Drug Measurement                                 		10-11

SECTION 11 - VICTIM DATA
         Victim Sequence Number                               		11-1
         Victim Connected to Offense Code          		11-1
         Victim Type                                          		11-2
         Victim Age                                           		11-2
         Victim Sex                                           		11-3
         Victim Race                                          		11-4
         Victim Ethnicity                                     		11-5
         Victim Resident Status                               		11-6
         Agg. Assault & Homicide Circumstances		11-7
         Agg. Assault & Murder Circumstances              		11-8
         Negligent Manslaughter Circumstances		11-11
         Justifiable Homicide and
         Justifiable Agg. Assault Circumstances		11-12
         Additional Justifiable Circumstance                  		11-13
         Injury                                           			11-14
         Offender Number to be Related                        		11-15
         Relationship of Victim to Offender                   		11-16
         Law Enforcement Officers Killed or Assaulted (LEOKA) 	11-21
         LEOKA Activity                                       		11-21
         LEOKA Assignment                                     		11-21

SECTION 12 - OFFENDER DATA
         Offender Sequence Number                              		12-1
         Offender Age                                          		12-2
         Offender Sex                                          		12-2
         Offender Race                                         		12-3

SECTION 13 - ARRESTEE DATA
         Arrestee Data                                         		13-1
         When to Report an Arrest                              		13-2
         Arrests for Other Agencies                            		13-2
         Note on Group B Arrests                               		13-3
         Arrestee Sequence Number                              		13-4
         Arrest Transaction Number (Case Number)        		13-4
         Arrest Date                                           		13-4
         Type Arrest                                           		13-5
         Multiple Clearance Indicator                  		13-6
         Note on Serving Warrants on Arrestees Still in Jail               13-10
         Offense Code                                          		13-11
         Multiple Offense Codes                                		13-12
         Conversion from Statutes not Allowed        		13-13
         Weapon (Arrestee Armed with)                          		13-15
         Arrestee Age                                          		13-18
         Arrestee Sex                                          		13-18
         Arrestee Race                                         		13-18
         Arrestee Ethnicity                                    		13-19
         Arrestee Resident Status                              		13-20
         Disposition of Arrestee Under 18                      		13-21
         Drug Arrests                                          		13-23
         Drug Activity                                         		13-23
         Drug Type                                             		13-24
         Window Arrests                                        		13-25

SECTION 14 - COMMON QUESTIONS
         Points to Remember about NIBRS/SCIBRSSubmission        14-1
         Common Misunderstandings                       		14-4
         Automated Conversion                                   		14-4
         State Statutes not allowed                             		14-4
         Arrests Reported                                       		14-4
         Incidents/Arrests not Reported                         		14-4
         Uniform Traffic Tickets; County/MunicipalSummons           	14-4
         Window Records                                         		14-5
         Relationships                                          		14-5

SECTION 15 - OFFENSE LOOKUP TABLE
         Offense Lookup Table                                   		15-1

SECTION 16 – APPENDIX – FORMS (Not available on the web site.
                        Call 803-896-7016 for paper copies.)

 

 

 

 

SOUTH CAROLINA INCIDENT-BASED REPORTING SYSTEM

GUIDE/TRAINING MANUAL

(Includes all NIBRS and SCIBRS definitions and data elements)

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION 1

REPORTING RULES

 

 

 

COMMON TERMS FOR THE COLLECTION OF UNIFORM CRIME DATA

 

UCR: Uniform Crime Reporting - a blanket term covering all reporting of crime under the national uniform crime reporting standards administered by the FBI.

 

SBR: Summary-Based Reporting - the old UCR administered by the FBI, which is based upon the reporting of tallied summaries, rather than upon the submission of individual incidents or arrests.

 

IBR: Incident Based Reporting - the method of collecting individual incident and arrest records, as opposed to the aggregate/ summary numbers collected under SBR.

 

NIBRS: National Incident-Based Reporting System - the SCIBRS system which is replacing the old national Summary-Based UCR.

SCIBRS: South Carolina Incident-Based Reporting System - South Carolina's version of IBR; it includes 100% of the NIBRS elements, plus a few elements specific to this state. This is the official name of the South Carolina system, although all SCIBRS reporting is frequently referred to as NIBRS.

LIBRS: Local Incident-Based Reporting System - the local reporting systems of sheriff's offices and police departments; these generally include more detail than either NIBRS or SCIBRS.

 

 

 

 

 

1-1

 

INCIDENT-BASED REPORTING

 

The primary objective of the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program is to collect a reliable and detailed set of criminal statistics for use in law enforcement administration, operations, and management. Not all crimes are good indicators of the nature and trends in crime or readily come to the attention of law enforcement. Therefore, the following offense categories, known as Group A offenses, were selected as those for which extensivecrime data will be collected in the S.C. Incident-Based Reporting System (SCIBRS).

 

GROUP A

(SUBMIT INCIDENT, ARREST & SUPPLEMENTAL DATA)

 

1. Arson/Burning

Arson

Suspicious Fire *

2. Assault Offenses

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Intimidation

3. Bribery

4. Burglary/Breaking and Entering

5. Counterfeiting/Forgery

6. Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property

7. Drug/Narcotic Offenses

Drug/Narcotic Violations

Drug Equipment Violations

8. Embezzlement

9. Extortion/Blackmail

10. Fraud Offenses

False Pretenses/Swindle/Confidence Game

Credit Card/Automatic Teller Machine Fraud

Impersonation

Welfare Fraud

Wire Fraud

11. Gambling Offenses

Betting/Wagering

Operating/Promoting/Assisting Gambling

Gambling Equipment Violations

Sports Tampering

12. Homicide Offenses

Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter

Negligent Manslaughter

Justifiable Homicide

 

 

 

1-2

 

13. Kidnapping/Abduction

14. Larceny/Theft Offenses

Pocket-picking

Purse-snatching

Shoplifting

Theft from Building

Theft from Coin-Operated Machine or Device

Theft from Motor Vehicle

Theft of Motor Vehicle Parts or Accessories

All Other Larceny

15. Motor Vehicle Theft/Using Without Consent

Motor Vehicle Theft

Using Without Consent *

16. Missing Person *

17. Pornography/Obscene Material

18. Prostitution Offenses

Prostitution

Assisting or Promoting Prostitution

19. Prowler *

20. Robbery

21. Sex Offenses, Forcible

Forcible Rape

Forcible Sodomy

Sexual Assault With An Object

Forcible Fondling

22. Sex Offenses, Non-forcible

Incest

Statutory Rape

Sexual Exposure *

23. Stolen Property Offenses (Receiving, etc.)

24. Suicide *

25. Telephone Calls; Obscene, Harassing (Not Intimidation) *

26. Weapon Law Violations

 

 

 

* Offenses followed by "*" are South Carolina-specific categories.

 

 

 

1-3

 

GROUP B

(SUBMIT ARREST DATA ONLY)

1. Bad Checks

2. Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor *

3. Curfew/Loitering/Vagrancy Violations

4. Disorderly Conduct

5. Driving Under The Influence

6. Drunkenness

7. Family Offenses, Nonviolent

8. Incorrigible Child *

9. Liquor Law Violations

10. Peeping Tom

11. Resisting Arrest *

12. Runaway

13. Trespass of Real Property

14. Truancy *

15. All Other Offenses*

 

 

Offenses followed by "*" are South Carolina-specific categories.

 

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Group B arrest codes may be used with a Group A arrestee segment. However, Group A arrest codes may not be used with a Group B arrestee segment.

 

 

 

1-4

 

SCIBRS REPORTS

 

Participation in SCIBRS requires that certain facts be reported on each criminal incident coming to law enforcement attention. In most cases, the data are captured through an incident report form, generally completed when a crime is first reported to thelaw enforcement agency. Incident report forms are an integral part of SCIBRS and have been designed with care to satisfy the primary needs of thelocal agency and provide SCIBRS data as a by- product.

In SCIBRS, there are four basic types of police reports: (1) the Incident Report; (2) the Arrest (Booking) Report; (3) the SupplementalReport; and (4) the Supplemental Incident Report. These reports are used by local law enforcement agencies to routinely report crimes and arrests to their local records systems. When properly utilized by officers as police reports, the forms also produce SCIBRS data as a by-product.

 

COUNTING:

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS, PROPERTY, SOCIETY

SCIBRS offenses are divided into three categories; "Crimes Against Persons," "Crimes Against Property," or "Crimes Against Society." "Crimes Against Persons" are those whose victims are always "Individuals," e.g., murder, forcible rape, assault. The object of "Crimes Against Property" is to obtain money, property, or some other benefit, e.g., robbery, bribery, burglary. "Crimes Against Society" represent society's prohibition against engaging in certain types of activity, e.g., gambling, prostitution, drug violations.

 

FOR COUNTING PURPOSES:

ONE offense is counted for each VICTIM of a "Crime Against Person";

ONE offense is counted for each distinct OPERATION (each incident/case) for "Crime Against

Property" (except motor vehicle theft, where one offense is counted for each vehicle stolen);

ONE offense is counted for each OPERATION (each incident/ case) for "Crime Against Society."

(For an expanded listing of crimes against persons, property and society, refer to 7-9 and 7-10).

 

 

NOTE: One incident, or one "operation" may have several victims or offenders under a single case number.

For instance, one incident of Murder may occur in which three family members are murdered in their home. The three victims will be reported in a single incident under a single case number. The Murder count willbe "three" (3).

However, one incident of Larceny from a Motor Vehicle may occur in which three vehicles are broken into in a movie parking lot in a singleoperation. The three victims will be reported in a single incident undera single case number. The Larceny count will be "one" (1).

 

 

1-5

 

 

 

JURISDICTIONAL REPORTING RULES

To be certain that data are not reported more than once by overlapping jurisdictions, the following guidelines apply:

1. City law enforcement agencies report offenses that occur within their city boundaries.

2. County and state law enforcement agencies report offenses which take place in the county outside the limits of the city.

3. When two or more agencies are involved in the investigation of the same offense and there is a written or oral agreement defining the roles of the investigating agencies, the agreement should designate which agency will report the offense. ONLY ONE AGENCY WILL REPORT THE OFFENSE, THE ARREST, AND THE CLEARANCE.

"METRO UNITS": Regional or "metro" drug units must have agreements in place which insure compliance with jurisdictional reporting rules. (An agency may wish to keep internal information on cases in which they assist other law enforcement agencies. This can be done by using special local codes.)

4. Agencies report only those arrests made for offenses committed within their own boundaries/jurisdictions. IF AN AGENCY MAKES AN APPREHENSION FOR ANOTHER AGENCY'S CASE, ONLY THE AGENCY WHICH REPORTED THE ORIGINAL INCIDENT WILL REPORT THE ARREST. See note on "metro" units, above. (Theapprehending agency may want to keep an internal count of these apprehensions, using a special local code).

5. The recovery of property is reported only by the agency that first reported it missing and/or stolen, regardless of which agency recovered it. (An agency may wish to keep internal records of property recovered for other law enforcement jurisdictions. This can be done using special local codes.)

6. Certain cases are sometimes turned over to state or federal agencies for continued or "final" investigation. This is sometimes the case with investigations shared with SLED, the FBI, the Secret Service, etc. Inthese situations, the incident, arrest, and clearance should be reported by the local sheriff's office or police department having jurisdiction in the placewhere the crime originally occurred. The purpose of reporting UCR/SCIBRS data is to depict the nature and volume of crime in a particular community.

The purpose of SCIBRS is not to "claim" or take "credit" for the number of investigations, arrests, or clearances, or to serve as a measurement of departmental workload. Credit for caseloads, assists to other agencies, and work hours can be accomplished with internal codes which are not submitted to SCIBRS.

 

 

 

1-6

 

IMPORTANT GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PARTICIPATION

Listed below are some brief notes which "nutshell" some of the basic requirements for participation in automated submission of UCR/ SCIBRS data to the state and national programs. Unless otherwise noted, every note represents an absolute requirement for participation.

 

1. IGNORE STATE STATUTES and local ordinances. As explained elsewhere in this manual, UCR/SCIBRS definitions are general in naturein order to summarize actions, rather than to identify statutes (which vary greatly from state to state).

2. IGNORE COURT FINDINGS. UCR/SCIBRS data are meant to capture law enforcement findings, and, again, to describe events - not the outcome of hearings, inquests, indictments or trials.

3. COUNT ALL ATTEMPTED OFFENSES. All attempted crimes MUST be coded. They are entered exactly the same as completed crimes, except that they are code as "attempted" rather than "completed" in the appropriate space on your screen. Remember, the purpose of UCR/SCIBRS is to count criminal activity, not statutory charges. Therefore, an officer may be able to identify an incident as being an attempted Burglary, even though the actual charge may only be Malicious Damage to Property. (The only exception to thisrule is that attempted Murder is coded as Aggravated Assault.)

4. CODE ALL OFFENSES: All offenses identified in a single incident MUST be coded within that incident. For instance, if a home is broken into, a woman raped, and a man shot, then that single incident MUST contain thecodes for Burglary, Rape, and Aggravated Assault. (This procedure does NOT affect an agency's crime rate, since only the most serious crime is selected for that count; the other codes are used to produce specialized reports which give a more detailed picture of criminal events.)

5. CRIME RATES: Many agencies are concerned that coding multiple offenses in a single incident will increase their crime rates. Thisbelief is not accurate. All offenses identified in a single incident MUST be coded; HOWEVER, the SLED computer selects only the single most serious offense in an incident to be counted in an agency's crime rate. This is exactly the same procedure for counting that has been used by the FBI and SLED for decades.

(The additional codes are used to produce specialized reports for your agency which allow you to have a more complete and detailed look at criminal activity in your area. For example, in the example above, you know that the rape occurred in a home during a burglary,in which another victim was shot. In the old program, all you would have known about the incident wasthat a woman was raped.)

 

 

 

1-7

 

Important General Requirements, continued

 

6. REPORT ALL GROUP A INCIDENTS AND ARRESTS: All Group A incidents and arrests MUST be entered, even though handled through the use of S.C. Uniform Traffic Tickets. (Agencies submitting paper incidents to the state program were asked not to submit certain kinds of crimes. However, whenever an agency begins automated submission, all Group A crime must be submitted.)

7. GROUP B OFFENSES: Only arrests for Group B crimes can be submitted to the SCIBRS program, however,

Your software should allow you to enter ANY kind of incident for your own internal use, whether Group A or

Group B,

The software should be designed to download to the SCIBRS data file ONLY the arrest information

from Group B incidents (while downloading both incident and arrest data for Group A incidents),

Group B offenses codes CAN be submitted on Group A arrest records, if appropriate,

All Group B arrests MUST be reported, even those handled through the use of a S.C. Uniform Traffic

Ticket.

8. IN-HOUSE CODES: If your agency wishes to collect information on NON- REPORTABLE events,

such as

Traffic Accidents

Bench Warrants

Mental Commitment Papers

Arrests Made for Other Agencies

Assisting Other Jurisdictions

Non-criminal Events,

Then your agency MUST develop in-house codes which will NOT be downloaded to the SCIBRS data file. Your software vendor or programmer can assist you in this matter.

The category of All Other Offenses (code 90Z) is to be used ONLY for CRIMINAL violations which do not better fit into a more specific category. 90Z MUST NOT be used to report "routine traffic" offenses or non-criminal events.

9. TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS: No traffic violations may be submitted to the SCIBRS program except DUI (90D), Vehicular Homicide (90Z), and Hit and Run with injury (90Z).

10. UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKETS and COUNTY/MUNICIPAL UNIFORM ORDINANCE SUMMONS (Non-custodial Arrests): As specified by South Carolina statutes 56-7-10 and 56-7-80, ALL arrests effected through the use of the S.C. Uniform Traffic Ticket MUST be reported to the UCR/SCIBRS program (except "routine" traffic; see item 9, above).

Many agencies believe that non-custodial arrests in which defendants are released at the scene do not need to be reported to SCIBRS.State law, however, requires that they be submitted.

Additionally, any agency not reporting these arrests will be lowering its arrest counts, while neighboring jurisdictions will be showing them, giving an incorrect picture of law enforcement actions for the agency which fails to report.

 

 

 

1-8

 

Important General Requirements, continued

 

11. CONSPIRACY, ACCESSORY, AIDING AND ABETTING:

All GROUP A offenses preceded by such terms as "Conspiracy to Commit", "Accessory Before", "Accessory After", etc. should be coded as All Other Offenses, (90Z).

All GROUP B offenses preceded by such terms as conspiracy, accessory, etc., should be coded as the specific Group B offense which these words precede.

For example;

Conspiracy to commit murder should be coded as All Other Offenses (90Z);

Conspiracy to violate liquor laws should be coded 90G, Liquor Law Violation.

12. CONVERSION OF SCIBRS CODES FROM STATUTES: As explained elsewhere in this manual, an automated (computerized) conversion of SCIBRS codes from state statutes or local ordinances IS NOT ALLOWED in this program. If an agency's software contains a routine which automatically converts statutesor ordinances to SCIBRS codes, that system is in violation of standards,and MAY NOT send automated data to the state or national programs.

UCR/SCIBRS standards have always required that the specific actions in any incident be evaluated in light of the uniform definitions in order to arrive at an offense classification, regardless of how the event is titled under state law.

The reasons for using UCR/SCIBRS codes instead of statutes is explained elsewhere. However, briefly stated, the reason is that state codes vary widely in the fifty states, and what may be called by the title "Burglary" in one state may be called "Larceny" or "Trespass" in other states. This well-understood fact means that uniform definitions MUST be used in all fifty states so that incidents are called by the same titles everywhere.

 

 

It is necessary that each law enforcement agency in this state, and in the nation, conform to the same standardized reporting practices in order for crime information to be fairly and uniformly collected, with maximum utility to criminal justice agencies, government, and the public.

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

1-9

 

 

 

 

SECTION 2

GROUP "A" DEFINITIONS

A - C

 

 

INCIDENT-BASED REPORTING

GROUP A OFFENSE DEFINITIONS

 

Why use UCR/SCIBRS definitions instead of state statutes?

 

The definitions which were developed for the SCIBRS System are NOT meant to be used FOR CHARGING persons with crimes. They are designed tobe used as uniform categories for reporting crimes that are committed throughout the nation. Their purpose is to provide a "common denominator" language which overcomes the variations between local and state laws in this state, and especially the variations between states. State statutes and local ordinances must be very specific in charging persons who are going to be prosecuted under state and local law. The definitions used in SCIBRS are necessarily "generic" so that they will mean the same thing in all forty-six counties of South Carolina, as well as in all fifty states.

A brief example may illustrate this:

In state "X" a person can be charged with "Burglary" ONLY if he breaks into an occupied dwelling during the hours of darkness;

In state "Y" a person can be charged with "Burglary" if he unlawfully enters ANY kind of permanently affixed structure at any hour of the day;

In state "Z" a person can be charged with "Burglary" if he unlawfully enters a structure, trailer, enclosed watercraft, motorized vehicle, aircraft, or any temporary shelter at any hour of the day, regardless of occupancy or abandonment.

It is clear that the state statutes concerning "Burglary" mean quite different things in these three states. Therefore, if the burglary counts for each state were classified on the bases of statutes, there would be no way to compare the information. These kinds of examples apply to local ordinances as well.

(Compare these hypothetical statutes to the "generic" SCIBRS definition of Burglary given below; you will see that X and Y both fit the SCIBRS definition completely, while only a part of the Z statute fits. This is the perfect example of why UCR/SCIBRS definitions must be used instead of statutes.) The most difficult adjustment which most experienced law enforcementpersonnel have to make in using the UCR/SCIBRS system is to mentally separate the statutes used for charging criminals from the generic UCR codes. This has been so since UCR was first developed by the IACP in the early decades of this century. However, use of these UCR/SCIBRS codes is mandatory for any agency submitting data to the state or national UCR program.

 

 

 

2-1

 

 

 

 

CONVERSION FROM STATE STATUTES OR OTHER CODES

NOT ALLOWED

 

The nature of UCR/SCIBRS classification makes it impossible to convert state statutes to UCR/SCIBRS codes. Any procedure which converts state or local laws or any other set of codes into UCR/SCIBRS codes, whether manual or automated, will disqualify an agency from participation in theautomated submission of UCR/SCIBRS data to the state and national UCR programs. It is an absolute requirement of the system that the actions described in each incident be considered against the definitions given in this manual, in order to arrive at the correct UCR/SCIBRS code.

 

 

 

 

2-2

 

UCR/SCIBRS DEFINITIONS

GROUP A

 

 

1. Arson, Burning: (Crime Against Property)

 

A. Arson - 200

Definition - To unlawfully and intentionally damage, or attempt to damage, any real or personal property by fire or incendiary device.

Only fires determined through investigation to have been unlawfully and intentionally set are to be classified as Arson. Attempts to burn must be included. (See below for fires of suspicious or unknown origin.) One incident should be reported for each distinct arson event. If an arson is committed at one address and spreads to another, it would be reported as only one incident (with possible multiple victims).

If a person is killed as a direct result of an arson, then both an arson and a murder will be reported on the same incident. Persons injured as a direct result of an arson will be reported as assaulted on the sameincident. (Arson-related deaths and injuries of police officers and fire fighters, are not counted as murders or assaults if they occurred while fightingthe fire.)

 

 

B. Suspicious Fires - 978 (Not a Crime)

Fires of a suspicious or undetermined nature should be reported as Suspicious Fires. If they are later found to be accidental in nature, they can be unfounded. If they are later found to be arsons, then the incident codes can be changed to Arson - 200.

Suspicious Fires are not considered a part of your crime rate or clearance rate.

 

 

 

2-3

 

2. Assault Offenses (Crimes Against Persons)

General Definition - An unlawful attack by one person upon another.

 

 

A. Aggravated Assault - 13A

Definition - An unlawful attack by one person upon another wherein the offender uses a weapon, or displays it in a threatening manner, or the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severelaceration, or loss of consciousness due to injury.

For purposes of Aggravated Assault reporting, a "weapon" may be either a commonly known weapon (a gun, knife, club, etc.) OR ANY OTHER OBJECT which is used as a weapon of opportunity, if that object could cause serious injury.

"Serious or aggravated bodily injury" is defined as an injury for which a reasonable person would expect to receive medical treatment (even if treatment was refused), or any injury which did receive significant medical treatment by trained medical personnel. "Loss of consciousness" must be the direct result of force inflicted upon the victim by the offender (not simply fainting from stress).

It is not necessary that injury result in an incident in which a gun, knife, or other object which could cause serious personal injury isused or where the weapon is brandished or displayed, or its use is threatened.

On occasion, it is the practice to charge assailants in assault cases with assault and battery or simple assault even though a dangerousweapon was used, or injury resulted. For SCIBRS purposes, this type ofassault MUST be classified as Aggravated (13A), regardless of the arrest charge.

 

REVIEW

An incident MUST be coded as Aggravated Assault - 13A, if;

A. The offender uses or attempts to use a weapon, or

B. The offender displays a weapon or dangerous object in a threatening manner (This includes "POINTING AND PRESENTING A FIREARM"), or

C. The victim receives serious or aggravated bodily injury.(regardless of whether there was a weapon used). (Serious or aggravated injury is that which a reasonable person would be expected to seek some level of medical attention.)

Circumstance codes for Aggravated Assaults are found on pages 11-7 through 11-8.

2-4

 

B. Simple Assault - 13B

Definition - An unlawful PHYSICAL (not verbal) attack by one person upon another where the offender neither uses nor displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggravated bodily injury.

 

REVIEW

An incident MUST be coded as Simple Assault - 13B, if;

A. There is a physical (not verbal) attack upon the victim, and

B. There is NO dangerous weapon or object likely to cause serious injury, and

C. There is NO injury which should require medical treatment.

 

 

C. Intimidation - 13C

Definition - To unlawfully place another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack.

Intimidation involves an offender making some type of threat to the victim without actually displaying a weapon. Such threats can be made in person, over the telephone, or in writing. Other types of conduct (such as STALKING) which put a victim in reasonable fear of bodily harm will be coded as 13C.

 

 

CLASSIFYING ASSAULTS: Careful consideration of the following factors should assist in classifying assaults:

1. The type of weapon employed or the use of an object as a weapon;

2. The seriousness of the injury;

3. The intent and capability of the assailant to cause serious injury.

Usually, the weapons used or the extent of the injury sustained will be the deciding factors in distinguishing Aggravated from Simple assault. In only a very limited number of instances should it be necessary to examine the intent and capability of the assailant to distinguish Simple from Aggravated. However, intent and capability may be factors in identifying Intimidation..

Prosecuting policy in a jurisdiction should not influence classification or reporting of SCIBRS data. It is necessary that assaults in each jurisdiction be examined and classified according to the standard UCR/ SCIBRS definitions, regardless of how an offender is charged.

 

 

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NOTES ON POINTING & PRESENTING A FIREARM, CDV, AND STALKING:

 

A. POINTING AND PRESENTING A FIREARM IS ALWAYS CODED AS 13A

B. CRIMINAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS ALWAYS CODED AS 13A, 13B, OR 13C

(Depending upon the actions in the CDV incident)

C. STALKING IS ALWAYS CODED AS 13C

 

NOTE: UCR/SCIBRS assault codes cover a wide range of criminal code violations, such as CRIMINAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE (CDV), Simple Assault, ABWIK, ABHAN, STALKING, Assault and Battery, POINTING AND PRESENTING A FIREARM, and similar charges. Incidents involving CDV, Pointing and Presenting,Stalking, or any other incident where an attack is made or attempted,or where threatening actions or words are involved, MUST be classifiedaccording to the Assault definitions given above, NOT by state statutes.

 

 

 

SPECIAL ASSAULTS, JUSTIFIABLE:

South Carolina has a special category of Aggravated Assault which collects "Justifiable" assaults. These justifiable assaults are defined and coded exactly like the "Justifiable Homicide" offense defined later in this manual, except that the offense code "13A" is used instead of the homicide code.

 

 

 

Justifiable Aggravated Assault (13A) is defined as:

A. When a Law enforcement officer, acting in the line of duty, uses deadly force against a criminal - but the criminal is injured, rather than killed.

B. When a private citizen uses deadly force against a criminal during the commission of a serious crime - but the criminal is injured, rather than killed.

 

NOTE: This category of Aggravated Assault is NOT meant to collect information about injuries received by arrestees while resisting arrest.

 

 

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3. Bribery - 510 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any thing of value (i.e., a bribe, gratuity, or kickback) to sway the judgment or action of a person in a position of trust or influence.

This offense does not include sports bribery, i.e., changing the outcome of a sporting contest or event (which is covered in the offenses dealing with gambling). The phrase, "The offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting of any thing of value...," includes such things as gratuities, kickbacks, favors, or anything else used illegally to influence the outcome of something that is governed by law, fair play, contractual agreement, or any other guideline.

 

 

4. Burglary/Breaking and Entering - 220 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The UNLAWFUL ENTRY into a building or other STRUCTURE with the intent to commit a serious crime or a theft.

 

NOTE: If the investigation reveals that there was likely an intent to steal (drawers opened, containers spilled, etc.) during an unlawful entry, then the incident must be coded as a burglary, even though nothing was actually stolen. The same is true if another kind of serious crime such as rape or arson was committed or attempted.

 

STRUCTURES: In the SCIBRS standard definition of burglary, a structure can be considered a building or walled enclosure which canbe enclosed on ALL sides by closing doors or windows. "Structures" may include, but are not limited to, the following:

Apartment Office
Barn Other Building
Cabin Outbuilding
Church Public Building
Condominium Railroad Car
Dwelling House Room
Factory School
Garage Stable
House Trailer Vessel (Ship)
Mill Warehouse
Houseboat (used as permanent dwelling)

 

 

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NOT STRUCTURES: The following are NOT considered structures for UCR coding:


Motor Vehicles                          Motor Homes
Travel/Camping Trailers              Tents
Carports                                    Fenced Enclosures

Any trailer or other mobile unit that is permanently fixed or otherwise made semi-permanently immobile as an office, residence, or storehouse may also be considered a structure.

("Auto Breaking" is NOT a burglary for SCIBRS purposes, since a motor vehicle is not considered to be a structure.)

 

Whenever a question arises as to whether a type of structure comes within the burglary definition, the law enforcement officer should look to the nature of the crime and be guided by the examples set forth. The illegalentry of a tent, tent trailer, motor home, house trailer, or any other mobile or temporary unit should NOT be classified as burglary.

 

MOTELS, STORAGE UNITS, ETC.: Burglaries of hotels, motels, lodging houses, or other places where lodging of transients is the main purpose, or burglaries of rental storage facilities, must be reported in a very specific manner.

If a several units under a single manager are burglarized, the burglary MUST be reported as a SINGLE incident with only a SINGLE case number. The incident can list as many victims as necessary (including the business itself), but all must go under a single case number.

It is often the case that victims return to their rooms or storage units at different times, and may call the manager or police on different shifts or different days. In these cases, more than one case number is often

issued. BUT, at the time an agency's investigation determines that several units were burglarized as a single operation, then all victims MUST be consolidated under a single case number. (Any agency which does not consolidate reports in this manner will artificially inflate its crime counts.)

If the individual living areas in a building are rented or leased to the occupants for an extended period of time, then the tenant would not be considered transient, and each living area would be treated as a single

unit. Such burglaries should each be reported as separate incidents. Examples of this kind of incident would be the burglaries of a number of apartments in an apartment house, or of the offices of a number of commercial firms in a business building, or of the offices of separate professionals within one building, or of a number of rooms in a college dormitory.

 

NOTE: Thefts from motor vehicles (whether locked or not) are NOT considered burglaries.

 

 

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ATTEMPTED BURGLARY: All attempts to commit burglary MUST be coded as Burglary. It is true that many attempted burglaries may result in only property damage to doors or windows, with no actual entry to the structure being made. However, if the officer's investigation leads him or her to believe that the incident was actually an attempt to unlawfully enter the structure, then an attempted Burglary MUST be coded. The Burglary code must be used to report the incident to the state and national program, even though the agency may use an in-house classification such as "malicious damage". The intent of the program is to look at criminal activity, whether it is completed or not.

 

 

5. Counterfeiting/Forgery - 250 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The altering, copying, or imitation of something, without authority or right, with the intent to deceive or defraud by passing the copy or thing altered or imitated as that which is original or genuine; or the selling, buying, or possession of an altered, copied, or imitated thing with the intent to deceive or defraud.

Included in this category are offenses such as altering and forging public records, wills, deeds, etc.;; counterfeiting currency, coins, tickets, checks, credit cards, etc.; possessing forged or counterfeited instruments; erasures; signing the name of another or fictitious person; possession of counterfeiting apparatus; and selling goods with altered, forged, or counterfeited trademarks. Counterfeiting/Forgery offenses can involve elements of fraud, but they are treated separately due to their unique nature.

 

Altering a drivers' license is coded as 250.

 

 

 

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SECTION 3

GROUP "A" DEFINITIONS

D - G

 

 

 

6. Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property - 290 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it.

This offense includes a broad range of injury to property, i.e., from deliberate, extensive destruction of property to mischievous, less extensive damage such as minor graffiti or "keying" an automobile.

It does NOT include destruction or damage to property caused by fire.

Vandalism motivated by bias against a group (religious, racial, etc.) must also be coded as a Hate/Bias incident (page 9-3).

NOTE: "Incidental damage", that is, damage resulting during the commission of another offense (e.g., burglary, larceny) is to be reported in this offense category only if the reporting agency deems the amount of damage to be substantial. For example, "insubstantial" damage, such as a broken window, forced door, etc., might not be reported; but, "substantial"damage, such as where a truck is backed into a store front to gain admittance and major structural damage is caused, might be reported. The determination of whether the "incidental" damage was "substantial" is left entirely to the discretion of the reporting law enforcement agency and should not require burdensome damage assessments. However, each agency should have a clear internal policy to advise coders as to the dollar amount at which "incidental" damage is to be coded as Vandalism.

ALL "stand-alone" vandalism, defacing, or damage must be reported, even though the dollar amount may be small. (That is, all clear acts of vandalism must be reported. See the note above for a discussion on "incidental damage".)

 

 

7. Drug/Narcotic Offenses (Crimes Against Society)

General Definition - The violation of laws prohibiting the production, distribution, and/or use of certain controlled substances and the equipment or devices utilized in their preparation and/or use.

 

 

A. Drug/Narcotic Violations - 35A

Definition - The unlawful cultivation, manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, use, possession, transportation, or importation ofany controlled drug or narcotic substance.

 

Drug/Narcotic data for drug descriptions, quantities, and measurements are found on pages 10-8 through 10-11. Drug activity codes are found on page 9-8.

 

 

 

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B. Drug Equipment Violations - 35B

Definition - The unlawful manufacture, sale, purchase, possession, or transportation of equipment or devices utilized in preparing and/or using drugs or narcotics. This offense covers those cases involving drug paraphernalia, equipment, chemicals, illegal labs, etc.

NOTE: There are detailed coding procedures for drug incidents and arrests described later in this manual; they include drug descriptions (crack, marijuana, etc.) and activity codes (PWID, simple possession, etc.).

 

 

8. Embezzlement - 270 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The unlawful misappropriation by an offender to his/her own use or purpose of money, property, or some other thing of value entrusted to his/her care, custody, or control.

Examples of Embezzlement are:

A bank teller taking in a $500 deposit from a customer, and routing $100 of that deposit to her own account;

A checkout clerk at a supermarket charging only every other item for a friend coming through the line.

A police officer receiving $200 in fines and only turning over $150 to the court.

NOTE: Generally, the victims of embezzlement offenses are businesses, financial institutions, etc. (not family, friends, or roommates who fail to return loaned property, etc.).

 

 

9. Extortion/Blackmail - 210 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - To unlawfully obtain money, property, or any other thing of value, either tangible or intangible, through the use or threat of force, misuse of authority, threat of criminal prosecution, threat of destruction of reputation or social standing, or through other coercive means.

Extortion includes offenses where threats are made in non-confrontational circumstances, that is, where the victim is NOT in fear of IMMEDIATE harm. To put it another way, extortion is meant to put a victim in fear of future consequences. (Extortion and Blackmail are often committed by letter, note, or telephone, but may possibly include a face-to-facemeeting where there is clearly NO threat of immediate harm.)

 

 

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Extortion, continued

 

If during a demand for money, property, etc., there is a personal confrontation between the victim and offender AND the threat of force or violence might be carried out immediately, the offense must be reported as Robbery.

 

 

10. Fraud Offenses (Crimes Against Property)

General Definition - The intentional perversion of the truth for the purpose of inducing another person or other entity, in reliance upon it, to part with some thing of value or to surrender a legal right.

By definition, Fraud involves either the offender receiving a benefit or the victim incurring a detriment. The benefit or detriment could be either "tangible" or "intangible."

The most specific subcategory of Fraud should be reported whenever the circumstances fit the definition of more than one of the subcategories listed below. For example, most frauds would fit the definition of False Pretenses/Swindle/Confidence Game. But, if a credit card was used to perpetrate the fraud, the offense would be classified as Credit Card/Automatic Teller Machine Fraud. (In other words, use only ONE code from the categories 26A-26E in any one incident.)

The only fraud-related violations that would not be reported under the Fraud Offenses category are counterfeiting, forgery, and bad checks. These offenses are reported under their own specific offense classifications.

When classifying fraud cases other than the most obvious ones, i.e., con-games, swindles, etc., care should be used in applying the factsof the case to the definition of fraud. Often questions arise as to whether or not the facts of a case describe a fraud or a larceny. Both offensescan involve theft; however, it is the method used to steal that makes the difference between the two. Fraud is achieved through deceit or lying and larceny is the direct taking of something.

Examples of common fraud cases are where something of value, e.g., a VCR or automobile, is rented for a period of time but is not returned. The offense of "failure to return a rented vehicle" (or rented movies, etc.) is classified as fraud and not larceny. In such cases, the offenders originally had lawful possession of the property (the property was either rented or the person was in some way entrusted with its possession) and through deceit (they failed to return it, as promised) kept the property. This offense assumes that your agency believes that there was criminal intent in the failure to return theproperty.

 

 

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NOTE: (A common classification problem is the taking of gasoline without paying for it. If an offender takes gasoline from a self-service gas station without paying for it, the offense is classified as larceny. In this case, no contract was entered into nor agreement made for payment. This would be the same as taking a can of oil off of the station's rack. However, if a station attendant is asked to fill the tank, there is a tacit agreement that he will be paid for the gas, and the offender, never havingthe intention to pay for it in the first place, utilized deception to takethe gas. This, then, is classified as a fraud.)

 

 

A. False Pretenses/Swindle/Confidence Game/Flimflam/ Scam - 26A

Definition - The intentional misrepresentation of existing fact or condition, or the use of some other deceptive scheme or device,to obtain money, goods, or other things of value.

(Includes failure to return rented vehicles and other items where there is criminal intent.)

 

 

B. Credit Card/Automatic Teller Machine Fraud - 26B

Definition - The unlawful use of a credit (or debit) card or automatic teller machine (ATM) for fraudulent purposes.

(This offense does not apply to the theft of a credit/debit card but rather to its fraudulent use.)

 

 

C. Impersonation - 26C

Definition - Falsely representing one's identity or position, and acting in the character or position thus unlawfully assumed, to deceive others and thereby gain a profit or advantage, enjoy some right or privilege, or subject another person or entity to an expense, charge, or liability which would not have otherwise been incurred.

(Includes some types of identity theft.)

 

D. Welfare Fraud - 26D

Definition - The use of deceitful statements, practices, or devices to unlawfully obtain welfare benefits.

 

 

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E. Wire Fraud - 26E

Definition - The use of an electronic communications facility to intentionally TRANSMIT a false and/or deceptive message in furtherance of a fraudulent activity.

This classification applies to those cases where telephone, teletype, micro-relay facilities, etc., are used in the commission or furtherance of a fraud (includes telemarketing scams).

 

 

11. Gambling Offenses (Crimes Against Society)

General Definition - To unlawfully bet or wager money or something else of value; to assist, promote, or operate a game of chance for money or some other stake; to possess or transmit wagering information; to manufacture, sell, purchase, possess, or transport gambling equipment, devices, or goods; or to tamper with the outcome of a sporting event or contest to gain agambling advantage.

 

 

A. Betting/Wagering - 39A

Definition - To unlawfully stake money or something else of value on the happening of an uncertain event or on the ascertainment of afact in dispute. (Poker, video poker, slot machines, sports betting, etc.)

 

 

B. Operating/Promoting/Assisting Gambling - 39B

Definition - To unlawfully operate, promote, or assist in the operation of a game of chance, lottery, or other gambling activity. (Aiding, abetting, operating, etc.)

 

 

C. Gambling Equipment Violations - 39C

Definition - To unlawfully manufacture, sell, buy, possess, or transport equipment, devices, and/or goods used for gambling purposes. Such equipment is also known as "gambling paraphernalia".

 

 

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D. Sports Tampering - 39D

Definition - To unlawfully alter, meddle in, or otherwise interfere with a sporting contest or event for the purpose of gaining a gambling advantage. This offense includes engaging in bribery for gambling purposes. For example, if an athlete was bribed to lose a sporting event, it would be reported as Sports Tampering, not Bribery.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

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SECTION 4

GROUP "A" DEFINITIONS

H - P

 

 

 

 

 

12. Homicide Offenses (Crimes Against Persons)

General Definition - The killing of one human being by another.

 

 

 

A. Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter - 09A

Definition - The willful killing of one human being by another.

 

As a rule, any death due to injuries received in a fight, argument, quarrel, assault, or commission of a crime is classified as a Murder (including many found by courts to be "in self defense).

Even though an offender may be charged with a lesser offense, such as manslaughter, the incident MUST be classified as Murder if the killingwas "willful" or intentional.

 

NOTE: The findings of a court, coroner's inquest, etc., do NOT affect the reporting of offenses in this category. For instance, an inquest or trial may find that a person acted "in self defense" in killing another person. These findings are ignored for UCR, and the incident is coded as Murder. (See "Justifiable Homicide - 09C" below.)

 

Assaults to murder and attempted murders are classified as Aggravated Assaults.

 

 

B. Negligent Manslaughter - 09B

Definition - The killing of another person through negligence.

Included in this offense are killings resulting from hunting accidents, gun cleaning accidents, children playing with guns, and other criminal negligence which may result in the death of another person.

NOT included are deaths of persons due to their OWN negligence, and accidental traffic fatalities. Again, the findings of acourt, coroner's inquest, etc., do not affect the reporting of offenses in thiscategory.

 

 

 

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C. Justifiable Homicide - 09C

Definition - A. The killing of a perpetrator of a serious criminal offense by a peace officer in the line of duty;

or

B. the killing, during the commission of a serious criminal offense, of the perpetrator by a private individual.

 

Justifiable homicide is not an actual "offense" and is not included in an agency's crime rate or clearance rate.

A "serious criminal offense" is usually a felony or serious misdemeanor. Do NOT count a killing as justifiable or excusable solely on the basis of "self-defense".

 

NOTE: USE OF TWO CASE NUMBERS IS REQUIRED. Justifiable homicide, often occurs in conjunction with other offenses. The crime that was being committed when the justifiable homicide took place MUST be reported asa separate incident with a separate case number. These guidelines are based on the UCR definition of an incident which requires that all of the offenders "act in concert." (It cannot be said that the criminal killed justifiably acted in concert with the police officer or civilian who killed him;nor that the police officer or civilian who killed the criminal acted in concert with the criminal in committing the offense that gave rise to the justifiable homicide. Therefore, justifiable homicide cases involve two criminal incidents rather than one.) (NOTE: It is clear that this procedure may not fit well within the normal records management practices of most departments. If the use of two case numbers in this case causes problems within your system, please contact the SLED UCR Department for suggestions on ways to deal with it.)

 

 

13. Kidnapping/ Abduction - 100 (Crime Against Person)

Definition - The unlawful seizure, transportation, and/or detention of a person against his/her will; or of a minor without the consent of his/her custodial parent or legal guardian.

NOTE: Kidnapping is often committed in conjunction with another crime, such as Rape or Robbery. In such cases, be sure to code alloffenses in a single incident, including the Kidnapping.

The unlawful transporting, taking, or keeping of a minor child without the consent of the custodial parent or guardian, or consent of thecourt, is coded as Kidnapping/Abduction.

 

 

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Kidnapping, continued

 

This offense includes not only kidnapping and abduction, but hostage taking, as well.

Although the object of a kidnapping may be to obtain money or property, this category is intended to capture information only on the persons actually kidnapped or abducted, not those persons or organizations paying

ransoms. Therefore, for each kidnapping incident,report as victims ONLY those persons taken or detained against their will (not their families, or businesses that paid a ransom).

 

 

14. Larceny/Theft Offenses (Crimes Against Property)

General Definition - The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession, or constructive possession, of another person.

 

Motor vehicle theft is NOT included in this category, but is collected separately because of its unique nature.

Statutory offense classifications such as "grand larceny" and "petty larceny," have no bearing on the UCR classification of Larceny.

All larceny offenses are reported regardless of the value of the property stolen.

 

NOTE: Only ONE incident (one case number) is to be filed for each operation of Larceny, regardless of the number of victims. For example, if ten automobiles are broken into in a movie theater parking lot, and your

investigation determines that they were all done in a single operation, then ONE incident and ONE case number will be filed. All victims will be listed under the one case number.

 

NOTE: Chose only ONE of the Larceny codes below (23A-23H) for each incident, even if you can identify multiple types of Larcenies. Chose the code which seems to best describe the incident.

 

NOTE: Since Larceny is a part of the definition of Burglary and of Robbery, do not code Larceny as part of a Burglary or Robbery incident.

 

 

 

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A. Pocket-picking - 23A

Definition - The theft of articles from another person's physical possession by stealth where thevictim usually does not become immediately aware of the theft.

This type of theft includes removal of such items as wallets from women's purses and men's pockets and usually occurs in a crowd, public conveyance, or other similar situation. Theft from a person in an unconscious state, including drunken persons, should also be classified as Pocket-picking.

NOTE: If the victim is manhandled or force beyond simple jostling is used to overcome the resistance of the victim, the offensewill be classified as Robbery.

 

 

B. Purse-snatching - 23B

Definition - The grabbing or snatching of a purse, handbag, package, bag, etc., from the physicalpossession of another person.

NOTE: If more FORCE is used than is actually necessary to snatch the purse from the grasp of the person, or if a scuffle or shoving match occurs, the offense will be classified as ROBBERY.

 

 

C. Shoplifting - 23C

Definition - The theft, by someone other than an employee of the victim, of goods or merchandise exposed for sale.

NOTE: Shoplifters are often caught in the act. If the shoplifter uses force against a clerk or security guard in order to take the property or make a getaway, the offense will be coded as Robbery.

The classification of Shoplifting assumes that the offender had legal access to the premises, and thus, no trespass or unlawful entry was involved. This offense includes thefts of merchandise displayed as part of the stock in trade outside buildings, such as department stores, hardware stores, supermarkets, fruit stands, gas stations, etc.

 

 

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D. Theft From Building - 23D

Definition - A theft within a building which is either open to the general public or where the offender has legal access.

Do not include shoplifting and thefts from coin-operated devices or machines within open buildings; these are other specific larceny types. Thefts from buildings include those from such places as churches, restaurants, schools, libraries, public buildings, and other public and professional offices during the hours when such facilities are open to the public. Residences are not considered "buildings" for this definition.

A theft from a structure, accompanied by a breaking or unlawful entry (trespass) without breaking, should be reported as burglary and not larceny.

 

 

E. Theft From Coin-Operated Machine or Device - 23E

Definition - A theft from a machine or device which is operated or activated by the use of coins.

Some examples of such machines are candy, cigarette, and food vending machines; telephone coin boxes; parking meters; pinball machines; or washers and dryers located in laundromats where NO breaking or illegal entry of the building is involved.

If a building was broken into or illegally entered and a coin-operated machine in the building was rifled for money and/or merchandise, the matter would be classified as Burglary only.

 

 

F. Theft From Motor Vehicle - 23F

Definition - The theft of articles from inside a motor vehicle, whether it is locked or unlocked.

This type of larceny includes thefts from automobiles, trucks, truck trailers, buses, motorcycles, motor homes, or other recreational vehicles. It also includes thefts from any area inside the vehicle, such as thetrunk, glove compartment, or other enclosure. Some of the items stolen in this type of theft are cameras, suitcases, wearing apparel, packages, etc., which are NOT an integral part of the vehicle.

If a Theft from a Motor Vehicle occurs in conjunction with a Motor Vehicle Theft, the incident will be reported as a Motor Vehicle Theft with all the stolen property recorded within the appropriate property-type categories.

In larceny situations where both motor vehicle parts and accessories and articles from the motor vehicle are stolen, code the offense which has the greatest value of property loss. Report all of the property stolen.

 

 

 

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G. Theft of Motor Vehicle Parts or Accessories - 23G

Definition - The theft of any part or accessory AFFIXED to the interior or exterior of a motor vehicle in a manner which would make the item an attachment of the vehicle or necessary for its operation.

Motors, transmissions, radios, heaters, hubcaps, wheel covers, manufacturers' emblems, license plates, radio antennas, side-view mirrors, tape decks, CB radios, radar detectors, jacks, spare tires, etc., are considered "parts or accessories". If an item is portable, that is, it is not affixed to the vehicle, it is NOT considered a "part or accessory".

 

NOTE; ATTEMPTED 23F AND 23G: Attempts to steal items from motor vehicles often result in only property damage to the vehicle, or may be indicated by other observations, even though nothing was actually taken. However, if an officer's investigation indicates that there was an intent to steal something from a vehicle, then the incident must be coded as an attempted Larceny (23F or 23G). Experienced officers are usually able to identify such activity.

NOTE: Larceny from vehicles (23F) and larceny of vehicle parts (23G) require a "Method of Entry" code (forcible entry or non-forcible entry)>

 

 

H. All Other Larceny - 23H

Definition - All thefts which do not fit any of the definitions of the specific subcategories of Larceny/Theft listed above.

All Other Larceny includes thefts from fenced enclosures, open yards, etc. Thefts of bicycles, boats, bulldozers, other construction equipment, heavy equipment, farm equipment, airplanes, animals, lawn mowers, lawn furniture, hand tools, are also included where no breaking or entering of a structure is involved.

Additionally, the illegal entry of a tent, tent trailer, or travel trailer used for recreational purposes, followed by a theft or attempted theft, should be counted as All Other Larceny.

Taking gasoline from a self-service gas station and leaving without paying is considered All Other Larceny.

 

 

15. Missing Person - 979 (Crime Against Person)

Definition - A person missing under mysterious or unknown circumstances; NOT a known runaway.

Missing Persons are not considered a part of the crime rate or clearance rate.

"Missing Person" (979) investigations sometimes find that the incident is actually a Kidnapping, Rape, Murder, etc. Whenever investigative information changes the type of crime being reported, the agency must be sure to modify the incident offense code and submit the modified report to SCIBRS. (E.g. Missing Person changed to Rape.)

 

 

4-6

 

 

 

 

16. Motor Vehicle Theft - 240 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The theft of a motor vehicle.

A "motor vehicle" is defined for SCIBRS purposes as a self-propelled vehicle that runs on land surface and not on rails and which fitsone of the following property descriptions:

 

Automobiles - sedans, coupes, station wagons, family vans, four-wheel drive vehicles, convertibles, taxicabs, or other similar motor vehicles which were designed primarily as passenger vehicles (even though many four-wheel drive vehicles are actually used by owners to transport cargo).

 

Buses - motor vehicles which are specifically designed (but not necessarily used) to transport groups of people, such as city buses, school buses, church vans, commercial buses. etc.

Recreational Vehicles - motor vehicles which are specifically designed (but not necessarily used) to transport people and alsoprovide them temporary lodging for recreational purposes. Motor homes.

Trucks - motor vehicles which are specifically designed (but not necessarily used) to transport cargo, such as pickups, tractor-trailer rigs, dump trucks, etc.

Other Motor Vehicles - any other motor vehicles , such as, motorcycles, motor scooters, trail bikes, mopeds, snowmobiles, golf carts, etc.

 

Classify as Motor Vehicle Theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned. Include joyriding.

Do NOT include the taking of a vehicle for temporary use when prior authority has been granted or can be assumed, such as in family situations; or unauthorized use by chauffeurs and others having lawful access tothe vehicle. Other Group A offenses may, however, have occurred in these situations. For example, if a chauffeur steals a car entrusted to his care, an Embezzlement should be reported. (See Using Motor Vehicle Without Consent - 756.)

Failure to return a rented vehicle must be coded as a Fraud.

 

 

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Motor Vehicle Theft, continued

 

ATTEMPTED MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT: Attempts to steal motor vehicles often result in only property damage to the vehicle, without an actual theft of the vehicle. Experienced officers are able to identify attemptsto steal vehicles from their observations at the crime scenes, such as certain damage to steering columns, etc. When an officer's investigation indicates that there has been an attempt to steal a vehicle, then an attempted Motor Vehicle Theft MUST be coded. The intent is to report criminal activity identified by law enforcement officers, regardless of whether the offender was successful in completing the offense. Reporting an attempted vehicle theft, where that is determined to be the case, is certainly a better indicator of criminal activity than simply reporting property damage.

 

16A. Using Motor Vehicle Without Consent - 756 (Crime Against Property)

The taking of a vehicle, without the expressed consent of the owner, for temporary use when prior authority has been granted or can be assumed, such as in family situations; or unauthorized use by chauffeurs andothers having lawful access to the vehicle.

 

 

17. Pornography/Obscene Material - 370 (Crime Against Society)

Definition - The violation of local, state, or federal laws or ordinances prohibiting the manufacture, publishing, sale, purchase, or possession of sexually explicit material, e.g., literature, photographs, etc.

Exploitation of children is a frequent type of activity in these crimes, and care should be taken to use the "Exploiting Children" code discussed on page 9-8 of this manual.

 

 

18. Prostitution Offenses (Crimes Against Society)

General Definition - To unlawfully engage in or promote sexual activities for profit.

 

 

A. Prostitution - 40A

Definition - To unlawfully engage in sexual relations for profit.

This offense includes prostitution by both males and females.

 

 

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B. Assisting or Promoting Prostitution - 40B

Definition - To solicit customers or transport persons for prostitution purposes; to own, manage, or operate a dwelling or other establishment for the purpose of providing a place where prostitution is performed; or to otherwise assist or promote prostitution. Aiding and abetting.

 

 

19. Prowler - 992 (Not a Crime)

Definition - A report of a suspicious person lurking in an area where he/she has no authority or right to be. These usually occur at residences.

Prowler incidents are not considered a part of the crime rate or clearance rate.

"Prowler" (992) is an incident code only. If an arrest is made in conjunction with a Prowler incident, the arrest code will be "Trespassing", Peeping Tom", etc. If there is evidence of an attempt to break into a structure, the incident will be coded "Burglary".

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

4-9

 

 

 

SECTION 5

GROUP "A" DEFINITIONS

Q - Z

 

 

 

 

 

20. Robbery - 120 (Crime Against Property)

Definition - The taking, or attempting to take, anything of value under confrontational circumstances from the control, custody, or care of another person by force or threat of force or violence and/ or by putting the victim in fear of immediate harm.

 

Robbery involves the offender taking or ATTEMPTING to take something of value from a victim, aggravated by the element of force or threat of force. The victim, who usually is the owner or person having custody ofthe property, is directly confronted by the perpetrator and is threatened with force or is put in fear that force will be used.

If there is no direct confrontation or the victim is not in fear of immediate harm, an extortion should be reported.

In pocket-pickings or purse-snatchings, and some shopliftings, direct confrontation does occur, but force or threat of force is absent. However, if during a pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shoplifting, or other such crime, force or threat of force is used to overcome the active resistance of the victim, the offense must be classified as Robbery.

Cases involving pretended weapons or where the weapon is not seen by the victim but the robber claims to possess one are also classified as Robbery and the alleged weapon is reported. If an immediate "on-view" arrest or later investigation proves that there was no weapon, the offense is still classified as Robbery, but the weapon is reported as "None."

Because some type of assault is an element of the crime of robbery, an assault should not be reported as a separate crime as long as it wasperformed in furtherance of the robbery. However, if the injury results in death, a homicide offense must also be reported.

 

NOTE: In a Robbery event, report only ONE incident (one case number) for each distinct operation, regardlessof the number of victims. As in the case of other crimes against property, only one offense is counted regardless of the number of victims involved.

 

 

 

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NOTE: The victims of a robbery include not only those persons and other entities (businesses, financial institutions, etc.) from whom property was taken, but also those persons toward whom the robber(s) directed force or threat of force in perpetrating the offense. Therefore, although the primary victim in a bank robbery would be the bank, the teller toward whom the robber pointed a gun and made a demand should also be reported as a victim, as well as any other person upon whom an assault was committed during the course of the robbery.

NOTE: A Robbery MUST have at least one "Individual" victim, since, by

definition, it is required that a human victim be present.

 

 

21. Sex Offenses, Forcible (Crimes Against Persons)

General Definition - Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly or against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

 

CONSENT: For SCIBRS, the inability of the victim to give consent to a sexual

act is counted as "force".

A victim may be unable to give consent due to her or his:

very young age,

mental incapacity,

intoxication,

the influence of drugs,

physical incapacity,

very old age,

or other valid reasons.

It is incumbent upon the reporting agency to make an individual assessment of each case where a victim may have been unable to give consent to a sexual act.

The threat or misuse of authority is also considered "force".

 

ATTEMPTS: As with other SCIBRS offenses, ALL ATTEMPTS to commit forcible sex offenses MUST BE REPORTED. If the investigation is able to determine which of the four offenses below was being attempted, then the code for that offense (11A-11D) should be used.

If the investigation CAN establish that a sexual assault of some sort was being attempted by the offender, but there was not enough information to clearly say whether the intended assault was going to be a Rape, Sodomy, or Sex Assault with an Object, then the general practice, based upon lawenforcement experience over the years, is to code the event as an Attempted Rape (11A).

 

 

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It is sometimes the practice of prosecutors to charge an offender with ABHAN for prosecution purposes in cases of attempted sexual assault. Regardless of the charges for prosecution, however, the incident MUST be coded as an attempted Forcible Sex Offense (11A-11D) for SCIBRS.

Remember, the purpose of SCIBRS is to capture information on the nature of criminal ACTS, not on the nature of charges filed.

 

MULTIPLE SEX CRIMES, INDIVIDUAL VICTIMS: When multiple Forcible Sex Offenses are committed against an individual victim, each SCIBRS offense identified MUST be coded for the categories of Rape (11A), Sodomy(11B), and Assault with an Object (11C). So, if a victim was both raped and sodomized, then both of these codes (11A and 11B) must be used.

(The exception is Forcible Fondling - 11D, which is, by its nature, assumed to be a part of any of the first three offenses, and, therefore, is only to be reported if it is the ONLY type of sexual assault committed.)

 

 

A. Forcible Rape - 11A

Definition - The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against the person's will; or not forcibly where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

"Carnal Knowledge" is defined for SCIBRS as the penetration of the female sex organ (vagina) by the male sex organ (penis) – or an attempt to penetrate.

Forcible Rape includes both male and female victims. Females are most often victims of males performing carnal knowledge. However, it is sometimes the case that males are victims of females performing carnal knowledge – especially if the victims are very young (see "very young age" as "force", above).

 

NOTE: Because the SCIBRS definition of Rape (11A) requires "carnal knowledge", it is REQUIRED that at least one offender BE OF A DIFFERENT SEX THAN THE VICTIM. In other words, a Rape requires that a female victim have a male offender; a male victim must have a female offender. (The rape of one male by another male, is coded as "Forcible Sodomy" - 11B, eventhough it is sometimes loosely called "male rape".)

Only ONE incident and ONE case number is to be used when reporting a rape "event", regardless of the number of victims.

If force was used or threatened, the crime should be classified as Forcible Rape (11A) regardless of the age of the victim.

 

 

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CONSENT: The ability of the victim to give consent must be a professional determination by the law enforcement agency. The age of the victim plays a critical role in thisdetermination. Individuals do not mature mentally at the same rate. For instance, no four-year-old is capable of consenting; however, victims aged 10 to12 may need to be assessed within the specific circumstances.

If the investigation determines that the victim was too young to give intelligent consent, then that fact is counted as "force" for SCIBRS, and the offense will be coded as Forcible Rape (11A).

If NO force or threat of force was used, and the victim WAS able to give informed consent AND younger than the statutory age allowing consent, THEN the crime should be classified as Statutory Rape/CSC with a Minor (36B).

NOTE: This same assessment of a victim's ability to give mature/intelligent consent applies to ALL Forcible Sex Offenses (11A, 11B, 11C, 11D).

 

 

B. Forcible Sodomy - 11B

Definition - Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

If a victim is both raped and sodomized in one incident, then both offense codes must be reported.

Forcible Sodomy can involve victims and offenders of any sex.

 

 

C. Sexual Assault With An Object - 11C

Definition - To use an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

OBJECT DEFINED: An "object" or "instrument" is anything used by the offender other than the offender's genitalia. Examples are a finger, bottle, handgun, stick, etc.

 

 

D. Forcible Fondling - 11D

Definition - The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or, not forcibly where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

 

 

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Forcible Fondling, continued

 

Forcible fondling includes, but is not limited to, "indecent liberties" and "child molesting." Because Forcible Fondling is assumed to be an element of Forcible Rape, Forcible Sodomy, and Sexual Assault With An Object, it should be reported only if it is the sole forcible sex offense committed against a victim.

Forcible Fondling is meant to be a category of serious sex offenses, and efforts should be made by the reporting agency to distinguish serious unlawful sexual touching from other types of touching (which may also be unlawful, but not necessarily for sexual gratification).

 

 

22. Sex Offenses, Non-forcible (Crimes Against Persons)

General Definition - Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse (36A-36B); or,

Unlawful sexual exposure (36C).

 

 

A. Incest - 36A

Definition - Non-forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

 

 

B. Statutory Rape/ Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor - 36B

Definition - Non-forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

The SCIBRS category of Statutory Rape, unlike other SCIBRS classifications, must be derived from the state statute for Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor. The reason for this is evident in the word "statutory" inthe offense title. The classification of this offense is based upon the limits placed upon voluntary sexual activity by the laws of each state.

If force was used or threatened or the victim was incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or mental impairment, either temporary or permanent, the offense must be classified as Forcible Rape, not Statutory Rape.

 

 

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C. Sexual Exposure - 36C

Definition - The unlawful exposure of a person's sexual organs or other private parts for the purpose sexual gratification.

Sexual Exposure (36C) is considered to be a serious sex offense.

This code MUST NOT be used to report incidents of "indecent exposure" where a person exposes his or her private parts for reasons other than sexual gratification, such as urinating in public, etc. (these kinds of incidents must be reported to SCIBRS as "Disorderly Conduct"). NOTE: Some software vendors – in spite of being notified years ago – still use the term "Indecent Exposure" for this crime. You should insist that your software use the correct term.

 

 

CRIMINAL SEXUAL CONDUCT:

The South Carolina statute entitled "Criminal Sexual Conduct" (CSC), (in any degree), CAN apply to ANY or several of the SCIBRS codes concerning sex offenses. There is no way to convert a charge of CSC directly to a SCIBRS code. A determination MUST be madeby a trained coder who considers the actions performed in each individual incident.

The actions of offenders in each incident MUST be compared to the sex offense definitions given above, and SCIBRS codes applied on that basis alone – NOT by statute.

Any procedure, whether automated or manual, which makes a direct conversion of CSC to a specific SCIBRScode, without a review of facts specific to each incident, will disqualify an agency from participating inthe SCIBRS program.

 

 

23. Stolen Property Offenses - 280 (Crimes Against Property)

Definition - Receiving, buying, selling, possessing, concealing, or transporting any property with the knowledge that it has been unlawfully taken, as by burglary, embezzlement, fraud, larceny, robbery, etc.

 

 

24. Suicide - 980 (Crime Against Person)

Definition - The intentional taking of one's own life.

NOTE: This offense is not counted as a part of an agency's crime or clearance rate.

 

 

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25. Telephone Calls, Obscene, Harassing - 753 (Crime Against Person)

Definition - The unlawful use of telephones for harassment.

NOTE: If a telephone call is used to make threats which put a victim in reasonable fear of bodily harm, then the incident MUST be coded as Intimidation (13C).

 

 

26. Weapon Law Violations - 520 (Crime Against Society)

Definition - The violation of local, state, or federal laws or ordinances regulating the possession ,concealment, sale, purchase, transportation, manufacture, or use of firearms, cutting instruments, explosives, incendiary devices, or other deadly weapons.

 

NOTE: "Pointing and Presenting a Firearm" must be coded as Aggravated Assault (13A).

 

 

 

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5-7

 

 

 

 

 

SECTION 6

GROUP "B" DEFINITIONS

 

 

 

 

GROUP B OFFENSES

 

There are 15 Group B offense categories. They are designed to capture all CRIMINAL arrests which arenot covered in the Group A categories. Group B arrests include some very minor offenses, many of which are "rolled up" under the general category of "AllOther Offenses" (90Z).

 

NOTE: NO TRAFFIC ARRESTS are to be reported to SCIBRS except:

DUI (90D)

Hit and Run (with injury) (90Z, All Other Offenses)

Vehicular Manslaughter (90Z, All Other Offenses)

Failure to stop (90Z, All other offenses)

 

UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKET and COUNTY/MUNICIPAL UNIFORM ORDINANCE SUMMONS ARRESTS: ALL NON-TRAFFIC ARRESTS (including non-custodial arrests) effected through the use of the South Carolina UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKET and COUNTY/MUNICIPAL ORDINANCE SUMMONS TICKETS must be reported to the SCIBRS program as required by South Carolina statutes 56-7-10 and 56-7-80.

 

NOTE: Only arrestee segments for Group B crimes are reported to the SCIBRS program. However, your local software should be programmed to allow you to enter all incident and arrest reports (Group Aor B) into your local system. Your software must be programmed to prevent Group B incident reports from being submitted to the SCIBRS program.

 

It is allowed to submit Group B arrest codes on a Group A arrestee segment (level 6). However, it is not allowed to submit Group A arrestcodes on Group B arrestee segments (level 7). Your software should have this edit programmed into it.

 

 

 

 

GROUP B OFFENSE DEFINITIONS

 

 

1. Bad Checks - 90A (Crime Against Property)

Definition - Knowingly and intentionally writing and/ or negotiating checks drawn against insufficient or nonexistent funds.

This offense includes fraudulent checks and insufficient funds checks but NOT counterfeited checks or forged checks.

 

 

2. Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor - 90P (Crime Against Person)

Definition - This code is used whenever a person is charged with this offense under state statute.

 

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3. Curfew/Loitering/ Vagrancy Violations - 90B (Crimes Against Society)

Definition - The violation of a court order, regulation, ordinance, or law requiring the withdrawal of persons from the streets or other specified areas; prohibiting persons from remaining in an area or place in an idle or aimless manner; or prohibiting persons from going from place to place without visible means of support.

 

 

4. Disorderly Conduct - 90C (Crime Against Society)

Definition - Any behavior that tends to disturb the public peace or decorum, scandalize the community, or shock the public sense of morality.

This offense includes breach of the peace. Also, if a person is charged with Public Disorderly Conduct for the sole reason of being publicly intoxicated, then the arrest must be reported under the code 90E, Drunkenness.

This offense also includes such acts as urinating in public, "mooning", etc. (which may be called "Indecent Exposure" under local ordinance).

 

 

5. Driving Under the Influence - 90D (Crime Against Society)

Definition - Driving or operating a motor vehicle or common carrier while mentally or physically impaired as the result of consuming an alcoholic beverage or using a drug or narcotic.

This offense includes driving while intoxicated and operating a bus, train, streetcar, boat, etc., while under the influence. Felony DUI and Driving with an Unlawful Concentration of Alcohol (DUC) are included in this offense.

 

 

6. Drunkenness - 90E (Crime Against Society)

Definition - To drink alcoholic beverages to the extent that one's mental faculties and physical coordination are substantially impaired.

If a person is charged under the state statute "Public Disorderly Conduct" for the sole reason that he or she was publicly intoxicated, then the arrests must be coded as 90E, Drunkenness.

 

 

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7. Family Offenses, Nonviolent - 90F (Crimes Against Persons & Society)

Definition - Unlawful, NONVIOLENT acts by a family member (or legal guardian) which threaten the physical, mental, or economic well-being or morals of another family member (and which are NOT classifiable asother offenses, such as Assault, Incest, Statutory Rape, Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor, etc.).

Nonviolent Family Offenses include: abandonment, desertion, neglect, nonsupport, nonviolent abuse, mental cruelty, and nonviolent cruelty to other family members. It also includes the nonpayment of court-ordered alimony. ("Contempt of Court" should be coded as 90Z, All Other Offenses.)

Do NOT include VICTIMS of these offenses who are taken into custody for their own protection.

 

BENCH WARRANTS: The service of a Bench Warrant MUST NOT BE REPORTED to the SCIBRS program. If your agency desires to collect data on bench warrants, you must have your software programmed to allow you to enter a non-SCIBRS code which will not be submitted to the state program.

 

 

8. Incorrigible Child - 90K (Crime Against Society)

Definition - The service of court papers ordering your agency to take a person into custody as an Incorrigible Child.

 

 

9. Alcohol Law Violations - 90G (Crimes Against Society)

Definition - The violation of local, state, or federal laws or ordinances regulating the manufacture, sale, purchase, transportation, possession, or use of alcoholic beverages.

Included are violations of laws/ordinances prohibiting the operation of unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor; using a vehicle for the illegal transportation of liquor; Sunday sales, the OPEN CONTAINER act, and any other violation of laws regulating the use, consumption, possession, or sale of alcoholic beverages.

NOTE: Violation of the OPEN CONTAINER LAW is to be reported under this code. Also, ALL such violations effected through the use ofthe UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKET or COUNTY/MUNICIPAL UNIFORM ORDINANCE SUMMONS MUST be reported to SCIBRS.

Driving Under the Influence and Drunkenness violations are NOT included here, since they have their own specific codes.

 

 

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10. Peeping Tom - 90H (Crime Against Society)

Definition - To secretly look through a window, doorway, keyhole, or other aperture for the purpose of voyeurism.

 

 

11. Resisting Arrest - 90N (Crime Against Society)

Definition - To be used whenever a person is charged with Resisting Arrest.

 

 

12. Runaway - 90I (Not a Crime)

Definition - A person under 18 years of age who has willfully left home without the permission of his/her parent(s) or legal guardian.

While running away does not constitute a criminal offense, each "handling" or taking into custody of a runaway must be reported using the Group B arrestee segment. Detentions of runaways from one jurisdiction by another agency should be reported by the home jurisdiction.

 

 

13. Trespass of Real Property - 90J (Crime Against Society)

Definition - To unlawfully enter land, a dwelling, or other real property.

The entry of a structure WITHOUT intent to commit a serious crime or theft is to be counted as Trespassing (NOT Burglary).

 

 

14. Truancy - 90L (Crime Against Society)

Definition - This code is to be used if your agency takes a person into custody for Truancy.

 

 

15. All Other Offenses - 90Z (Crime Against Persons, Property & Society)

Definition - All criminal offenses which are not Group A offenses and not included in one of the specifically named Group B crimecategories listed above.

Traffic offenses are NOT included under All Other, except Hit and Run (with injury), Failure to Stop, and Vehicular Manslaughter.

 

 

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CONSPIRACY, ACCESSORY, AIDING AND ABETTING:

All GROUP A arrests preceded by such terms as "Conspiracy to Commit", "Accessory Before", "Accessory After", etc. should be coded as All Other Offenses, 90Z.

All GROUP B arrests preceded by such terms as conspiracy, accessory, etc., should be coded as the specific Group B offense which these words precede.

 

For example;

Conspiracy to commit murder would be coded 90Z, All Other;

Conspiracy to violate alcohol laws would be coded 90G, Alcohol Law Violation.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

6-5

 

 

 

 

SECTION 7

DATA SUBMISSIONS

 

 

 

 

 

SCIBRS DATA SUBMISSIONS

 

SCIBRS data submissions address crime incidents and all the elements associated with them, e.g., offenses, victims, offenders, property loss, clearances, and arrestees. The incident report is used to collect information about Group A offenses within sixrecord categories: Administrative (Level 1 record), Offense (Level 2 record), Property (Level 3 record), Victim (Level 4 record), Offender (Level 5 record), and Arrestee (Level 6 record).

In most cases, an initial incident report will contain administrative, offense, property (if applicable), victim, and offender information. Details concerning one or more arrestees may also be included if apprehensions were made by the time the initial report was submitted. However, in many cases,arrests will be made after the initial report and the arrestee information will be submitted as "updates" to the initial report. If an arrest involving a Group A offense occurs for a crime not previously reported to the UCR Program (e.g., an "on-view arrest") then, of course, all applicable data should be submitted.

Sometimes the applications for warrants are made without the police being notified of the details of the crime. Insofar as possible, when arrests for Group A offenses are made under these circumstances, the informationregarding the offenses should be obtained and reported as incident reports.

The Group B arrestee record (Level 7 record) is used to report data concerning each arrestee for a Group B offense. Only Group B arrests which are not associated with Group A incidents may be reported on a Group B arrest record (Level 7).

 

NOTE: Group A offense codes MAY NOT be used on Group B (Level 7) arrest records.

However, Group B offenses codes MAY be used on Group A (Level 6) arrest records in appropriate circumstances.

 

 

 

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WINDOW RECORDS

Arrests, Recoveries, and Exceptional Clearances

For Incidents Older than Current Year Minus One

As explained in another section of this manual, it is an operational necessity for the SCIBRS and NIBRS to purge all incident and arrest data which are older than the current calendar year and the calendar year just preceding the current year (the time-window called "current year minus one"). (Another way of saying this is say that all incidents dated prior to January 1st of the previous year are purged from the SLED and FBI active data bases and kept on tape files.) Your agency, of course,will keep records on your active data base for many years, but the state and national systems, which collect hundreds of thousands and millions of records in a few months, need to purge in order to be able to store current IBR data.

The issue, of course, is that your agency may make an arrest, a recovery, or an exceptional clearance associated with an incident which has been purged from the SCIBRS or NIBRS data base. Ordinarily, your agency can not report an arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance unless thereis an incident report on file with a matching case number.

A very simple method for reporting these kinds of events for older records has been devised. The recordsused to do this are referred to as "WINDOW" records (because they are associated with incidents which occurred prior to the active time-window of "current year minus one).

Whenever an arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance is to be sent to SCIBRS or NIBRS for an incident which is older than "current year minus one", then the appropriate record segment must be sent with an "Action Code" of "W" (Window):


Administrative Segment                 for Window Exceptional Clearance
Property Segment                         for Window Recovery
Arrestee Segment (Level 6)            for Window Arrest.

 

Your software should include programming which automatically sends Window records to SCIBRS when necessary, simply by comparing the date of the arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance being entered to the date of the original incident report and determining if the original incident is older than "current year minus one". However, not all software vendors have programmed this automatic conversion. If your vendor has not programmed this feature for you, you will have to manually format Window records. All local agencies must determine how their software handles this procedure, and insure that it works according to SCIBRS and NIBRS rules. SLED will be glad to talk with your agencyor your vendor about Window records. Failure to properly submit Window records will result in a very serious loss of arrest, clearance, and recovery data to your agency. Window reporting is required for compliance with SCIBRS and NIBRS rules.

 

 

 

7-2

 

Window Records, continued

 

 

NOTE: Group B Arrest Records (Level 7 Records, as shown below) CAN NOT be submitted as Window records. In the SCIBRS and NIBRS systems, Group B (Level 7) arrests do not have incidents associated with them, and, therefore, can not be cleared or have property recovered at the state or national levels. They are "stand-alone" arrests. Local records systems should have programming to handle Group B incidents and clearances, but such data must not be transmitted to the state and national programs.

NOTE: The data elements needed to submit Window records are shown below as part of the normal Group A data elements. They are designated by the word "Window", and are used only when the "Action Code" is "W".

 

 

 

7-3

 

 

Listed below are the data elements required for reporting

Group A, Group B, and Window SCIBRS information.

 

GROUP A INCIDENT REPORT

 

ADMINISTRATIVE DATA (LEVEL 1)

ORI Number Exceptional Clearance Date
Incident Case Number (OCA) Case Status Indicator
Incident Date/Hour Case Status Date
Exceptional Clearance Indicator         
Window Incident Offense Code

 

OFFENSE DATA (LEVEL 2)

UCR Offense Codes Method of Entry
Offense Attempted/Completed                         Type of Criminal Activity
Offender Suspected of Using Type Weapon/Force Involved
Victim Suspected of Using Automatic Weapon Indicator
Location/Premise Type (1st) Bias Motivation
Location/Premise Type (2cd) Number of Units/Premises Entered
Special Circumstance Codes

 

PROPERTY DATA (LEVEL 3)

Type Property Loss/Etc. Number of Recovered Motor Vehicles
Property Description Suspected Drug Type
Value of Property Drug Quantity
Date Recovered Drug Measurement
Number of Stolen Motor Vehicles Window Incident Offense Codes

 

VICTIM DATA (LEVEL 4)

Victim Sequence Number Aggravated Assault/Homicide Circumstances
Victim Connected to Offense Code Justifiable Homicide Circumstances
Type of Victim Negligent Manslaughter Circumstances
Age of Victim Type of Injury
Sex of Victim Offender Number(s) To Be Related
Race of Victim Relationship of Victim to Offender
Ethnicity of Victim LEOKA Type Activity
Resident Status of Victim LEOKA Type Assignment

 

OFFENDER DATA (LEVEL 5)

Offender (Sequence) Number        Race of Offender
Age of Offender Ethnicity of Offender
Sex of Offender

 

 

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Group A Incident Reports, continued

ARRESTEE DATA (LEVEL 6)

Arrestee Sequence Number Age of Arrestee
Arrest Case Number (Incident OCA) Sex of Arrestee
Arrest Date Race of Arrestee
Type of Arrest Ethnicity of Arrestee
Multiple Clearance Indicator * Resident Status of Arrestee
UCR Arrest Offense Codes Disposition of Arrestee Under 18
Arrestee Was Armed With Drug Arrest Type Activity
Automatic Weapon Indicator Drug Arrest Type Drug
Window Clearance Indicator Window Incident Offense Codes

 

*NOTE: The FBI/NIBRS nows calls this the Multiple Arrestee Segment Indicator

NOTE: Group A or Group B arrest offense codes may be used on Group A (Level 6) arrestee segment records. (However, as stated below, ONLY Group B arrest offense codes may be used on Level 7 arrestee records.)

NOTE: Window arrests can be submitted ONLY on Group A (Level 6) arrestee records, NOT on Level 7 arrestee records.

 

 

******

*************************************************************

******

 

GROUP B ARREST REPORT (LEVEL 7)

ORI Number UCR Arrest Offense Codes
Arrestee Sequence Number       Arrestee Was Armed With
Arrest Case Number Automatic Weapon Indicator
Arrest Date Age of Arrestee
Type of Arrest Sex of Arrestee
Resident Status of Arrestee Race of Arrestee
Ethnicity of Arrestee Police Disposition of Arrestee Under 18

 

NOTE: ONLY Group B arrest offense codes can be used on Group B (Level 7) arrest segment records.

NOTE: ONLY Level 6 arrest records can be submitted as Window records. Level 7 arrests CAN NOT be submitted as Windows.

 

 

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DEFINITION OF "INCIDENT"

 

An "incident" is defined for SCIBRS reporting purposes as one or more offenses committed by the same offender, or group of offenders acting in concert, at the same time and place. Put another way, an "incident" is a single, localized event which may involve multiple crimes, multiple victims, and multiple offenders (subjects). A single "incident" will always be reported under a single case number (OCA), regardless of the number of crimes or the number of victims or offenders involved.

"Acting in concert" requires that the offenders actually commit or assist in the commission of the crime(s). The offenders must be awareof, and consent to, the commission of the crime(s); or even if non-consenting, their actions assist in the commission of the offense(s). This is important because all of the offenders in an incident are considered to have committed all of the offenses in the incident. If one or more of the offenders did not act in concert, then there is more than one incident involved.

"Same time and place" means that the time interval between the offenses and the distance between the locations where they occurred were insignificant. Normally, the offenses must have occurred during an unbroken time duration and at the same or adjoining location(s). However, incidents can also becomprised of offenses which by their nature involve continuing criminal activity by the same offender(s) at different times and places, as long as the activity is deemed to constitute a single criminal transaction.

Because it is not possible to provide instructions which will cover all of the possible situations which might occur, in some cases the reporting agency will have to use its best judgment in determining how many incidents were involved.

 

 

7-6

 

 

CLASSIFYING OFFENSES

 

In the reporting of data to the SCIBRS Program, it is first necessary to classify appropriate offenses within an incident into the Group A or Group B offense categories as defined by SCIBRS. All criminal (non-traffic) offenses will be classified as either Group A orGroup B in SCIBRS. Both incidents and arrests are to be reported for Group A offenses, while only arrests are reported for Group B offenses (your local software should accept incidents for Group B offenses, but must submit only the arrestdata to SLED).

Each of the Group A offenses included in SCIBRS was selected based on the following criteria:

1. The seriousness or significance of the offense,

2. the frequency or volume of its occurrence,

3. the widespread nature of the offense nationally,

4. the likelihood that the offense will come to the attention of law enforcement,

5. whether law enforcement is the best channel for collecting data on the offense,

6. the burden placed on law enforcement,

7. the national statistical validity and usefulness of the collected data, and

8. as the collector of criminal incident information, the SCIBRS program's responsibility to make crime data

available, not only to law enforcement, but to others having a legitimate interest in it.

The goal is to capture information currently in law enforcement records, not to require the collection of additional information.

 

LAW ENFORCEMENT SHOULD REPORT OFFENSES AFTER A CALL FOR SERVICE OR A COMPLAINT ESTABLISHES THAT A CRIME WAS COMMITTED. OFFENSES KNOWN TO LAW ENFORCEMENT ARE TO BE REPORTED, NOT THE FINDINGS OF A COURT, CORONER, JURY, OR THE DECISION OF A PROSECUTOR, SINCE CRIME STATISTICS GENERATED FROM SCIBRS ARE INTENDED TO ASSIST IN IDENTIFYING LAW ENFORCEMENT ISSUES.

 

 

7-7

 

COUNTING

CRIMES AGAINST PERSONS, PROPERTY, SOCIETY

 

SCIBRS offenses are divided into three categories; "Crimes Against Persons," "Crimes Against Property," or "Crimes Against Society." "Crimes Against Persons" are those whose victims are always "Individuals," e.g., murder, forcible rape, assault. The object of "Crimes Against Property" is to obtain money, property, or some other benefit, e.g., robbery, bribery, burglary. "Crimes Against Society" represent society'sprohibition against engaging in certain types of activity, e.g., gambling, prostitution, drug violations.

 

 

FOR COUNTING PURPOSES:

Crimes Against Persons: ONE offense is counted for each VICTIM of a "Crime Against Persons";

Crimes Against Property: ONE offense is counted for each distinct OPERATION (each incident) for "Crime Against Property" (except motor vehicle theft, where one offense is counted for each vehicle stolen);

Crimes Against Society: ONE offense is counted for each OPERATION (each incident) for a "Crime Against Society."

 

NOTE: One incident, or one "operation" may have several victims or offenders. All victims and offenders will be reported under the same case number.

For instance, one incident of Murder may occur in which three family members are murdered in their home. The three victims will be reported in a single incident under a single case number. The Murder count willbe "three".

However, one incident of Larceny from a Motor Vehicle may occur in which three vehicles are broken into in a movie parking lot in a singleoperation. The three victims will be reported in a single incident under a single case number. The Larceny count will be "one".

 

 

7-8

 

SCIBRS OFFENSE CODES

The three-digit offense codes are to be used for identifying SCIBRS Group A and Group B offenses in Group A Incident Reports and Group B Arrest Reports. The codes are unique to SCIBRS but were derived from the four-digit National Crime Information Center (NCIC) Uniform Offense Classification Codes in order to facilitate interrelatingoffense data between the NCIC and UCR systems. In spite of this relationship between the two coding systems, it is NOT possible to make a directconversion from NCIC codes to SCIBRS codes; to do so constitutes a violation of UCR standards, and will cause an agency to become ineligible to participate in the submission of SCIBRS data.

 

 

GROUP A OFFENSES

OFFENSE CRIME AGAINST CODE COUNTS
Arson, Burning Property
Arson Property 200 Incidents
Suspicious Fire Not a Crime 978 Incidents
Assault Offenses: Person
Aggravated Assault Person 13A Victims
Simple Assault Person 13B Victims
Intimidation Person 13C Victims
Bribery Property 510 Incidents
Burglary/Breaking & Entering Property 220 Incidents
Counterfeiting/Forgery Property 250 Incidents
Destruction/Damage/Vandalism Property 290 Incidents
Drug/Narcotic Offenses: Society
Drug/Narcotic Violations Society 35A Incidents
Drug Equipment Violations Society 35B Incidents
Embezzlement Property 270 Incidents
Extortion/Blackmail Property 210 Incidents
Fraud Offenses: Property
False Pretenses/Swindle Property 26A Incidents
Credit Card/ATM Fraud Property 26B Incidents
Impersonation Property 26C Incidents
Welfare Fraud Property 26D Incidents
Wire Fraud Property 26E Incidents
Gambling Offenses: Society
Betting/Wagering Society 39A Incidents
Operating/Promoting Gambling Society 39B Incidents
Gambling Equipment Violations Society 39C Incidents
Sports Tampering Society 39D Incidents

 

 

7-9

 

Group A Offenses, continued

OFFENSE CRIMEAGAINST CODE COUNTS
Homicide Offenses: Person
Murder & Non-neg. Manslaughter Person 09A Victims
Negligent Manslaughter Person 09B Victims
Justifiable Homicide Not a Crime 09C Victims
Kidnaping/Abduction Person 100 Victims
Larceny/Theft Offenses: Property
Pocket-picking Property 23A Incidents
Purse-snatching Property 23B Incidents
Shoplifting  Property 23C Incidents
Theft From Building Property 23D Incidents
Theft From Coin-Operated
Machine or Device Property 23E Incidents
Theft From Motor Vehicle Property 23F Incidents
Theft of Motor Vehicle Parts
or Accessories Property 23G Incidents
All Other Larceny Property 23H Incidents
Missing Person Person 979 Victims
Motor Veh. Theft/Using w/o Con. Property
Motor Vehicle Theft Property 240 Vehicles
Using Vehicle w/o Consent Property 756 Incidents
Pornography/Obscene Material Society 370 Incidents
Prostitution Offenses: Society
Prostitution Society 40A Incidents
>Assisting or Promoting
Prostitution Society 40B Incidents
Prowler Not a Crime 992 Incidents
Robbery Property 120 Incidents
Sex Offenses, Forcible: Person
Forcible Rape Person 11A Victims
Forcible Sodomy Person 11B Victims
Sexual Assault With An Object Person 11C Victims
Forcible Fondling Person 11D Victims
Sex Offenses, Nonforcible: Person
Incest Person 36A Victims
Statutory Rape Person 36B Victims
Sexual Exposure Person 36C Victims
Stolen Property Offenses Property 280 Incidents
Suicide Person 980 Victims
Telephone Calls; Harassing Person 753 Victims
Weapon Law Violations Society 520 Incidents

 

 

 

 

GROUP B OFFENSES

 

Group B offenses are reported to SCIBRS only as arrest data, therefore, the counting scheme above does not apply at the state and national levels. Your agency, however may want to count them in-house.

 

OFFENSE CRIME AGAINST CODE
Bad Checks Property 90A
Contributing to Delinq. of a Minor Person 90P
Curfew/Loitering/Vagrancy Society 90B
Disorderly Conduct Society 90C
Driving Under the Influence Society 90D
Drunkenness Society 90E
Family Offenses, Nonviolent Person & Soc. 90F
Incorrigible Child Society 90K
Liquor Law Violations Society 90G
Peeping Tom Society 90H
Resisting Arrest Society 90N
Runaway Not a Crime 90I
Trespass of Real Property Society 90J
Truancy Society 90L
All Other Offenses Person, 90Z
  Property,
  Society

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

7-11

 

 

 

 

SECTION 8

ADMINISTRATIVE DATA

 

 

 

 

NOTE:

The following sections dealing with Segments 1 - 7 (Administrative, Offense, Victim, Offender, Property, Group A Arrest, and Group B Arrest) explain the information which is required for submission of SCIBRS records to the state and national programs. As you will notice, the information required is sometimes not in the format in which your agency performs its data entry. These segments are designed to deal with only the data which are submitted to SLED. The information which your agency enters may be much more detailed than the data which are submitted to SLED. We have tried to make notations in each area in which your data entry maybe more detailed or more complete than the minimum SCIBRS data submitted to SLED. Please notify us of any omissions. Feel free to call with questions.

 

 

8-1

 

WINDOW RECORDS

Arrests, Recoveries, and Exceptional Clearances

For Incidents Older than Current Year Minus One

As explained in another section of this manual, it is an operational necessity for the SCIBRS and NIBRS to purge all incident and arrest data which are older than the current calendar year and the calendar year just preceding the current year (the time-window called "current year minus one"). (Another way of saying this is say that all incidents dated prior to January 1st of the previous year are purged from the SLED and FBI active data bases and kept on tape files.) Your agency, of course,will keep records on your active data base for many years, but the state and national systems, which collect hundreds of thousands and millions of records in a few months, need to purge in order to be able to store current IBR data.

The issue, of course, is that your agency may make an arrest, a recovery, or an exceptional clearance associated with an incident which has been purged from the SCIBRS or NIBRS data base. Ordinarily, your agency can not report an arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance unless thereis an incident report on file with a matching case number.

A very simple method for reporting these kinds of events for older records has been devised. The recordsused to do this are referred to as "WINDOW" records (because they are associated with incidents which occurred prior to the active time-window of "current year minus one).

Whenever an arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance is to be sent to SCIBRS or NIBRS for an incident which is older than "current year minus one", then the appropriate record segment must be sent with an "Action Code" of "W" (Window):


Administrative Segment           for Window Exceptional Clearance
Property Segment                   for Window Recovery
Arrestee Segment (Level 6)      for Window Arrest.

 

Your software should include programming which automatically sends Window records to SCIBRS when necessary, simply by comparing the date of the arrest, recovery, or exceptional clearance being entered to the date of the original incident report and determining if the original incident is older than "current year minus one". However, not all software vendors have programmed this automatic conversion. If your vendor has not programmed this feature for you, you will have to manually format Window records. All local agencies must determine how their software handles this procedure, and insure that it works according to SCIBRS and NIBRS rules. SLED will be glad to talk with your agencyor your vendor about Window records. Failure to properly submit Window records will result in a very serious loss of arrest, clearance, and recovery data to your agency. Window reporting is required for compliance with SCIBRS and NIBRS rules.

 

 

 

8-2

 

ADMINISTRATIVE DATA

The administrative data portion of the Group A Incident Report allows the UCR Program to identify uniquely each criminal incident reported under IBR, along with common characteristics of all offenses within each incident, e.g., the date and hour the incident occurred. The administrative details to be reported for each incident are outlined below.

 

 

ORI NUMBER

The 9-character NCIC Originating Agency Identifier (ORI) Number assigned to your agency is used to identity (a) the reporting agency and (b) the location where the incident occurred. An ORI Number must be included in each Group A Incident Report (or Group B Arrest Report).

 

 

INCIDENT NUMBER (CASE NUMBER, OCA)

This is the case number assigned by your agency to each Group A Incident Report to identify it uniquely; sometimes called the Originating Agency Case Number (OCA). The number can be up to 12 characters in length andis the actual case number (OCA) of the incident.

This same number must be used to link the incident to property, arrests, etc.

 

 

INCIDENT DATE

Enter the month, year, and day, when the incident occurred, or a reasonable date spread if the actual date can not be determined. If a reasonable date spread can not be established, enter the date of the report (see Report Date Indicator, next page).

 

 

INCIDENT HOUR

Enter the time an incident occurred, or a reasonable time spread if the actual time can not be determined. If a reasonable time spread can not be established, enter your code for "unknown".

 

 

8-3

 

REPORT DATE INDICATOR (R)

If the incident date or a reasonable date spread can not be determined, enter the date of the report and enter an "R " in this field. Entry of an "R" indicates that the actual date ofthe incident can not be determined.

It is to be entered:

1. When the date of a crime CAN NOT be determined, or can not be determined within a reasonable date spread. Using the "R" tells the computer that you DO NOT know even a reasonable approximate date of the crime.

2. The crime was recently reported to your agency, but the actual date of the crime was prior to the "current year minus one".

 

 

 

EXCEPTIONALLY CLEARED

Incidents can be cleared by exceptional means when some element beyond law enforcement control precludes a physical arrest. Any exceptional clearance in an incident clears all offenses within the incident.

 

CONDITIONS NEEDED TO EXCEPTIONALLY CLEAR A CASE:

In order to clear an offense by exceptional means, ALL of the following four conditions MUST be met:

 

  1. The investigation must have clearly and definitely established the identity of at least one offender.

    (NOTE: The police investigation must establish the identity of the subject. If the victim knows, but will

    not tell the police, then this condition is NOT met.)

  2. Sufficient probable cause must have been developed which would support the arrest, charging, and

    prosecution of the offender.

  3. The exact location of the offender must be known so that an arrest could be made by your agency or

some other agency.

4. There must be a reason outside the control of law enforcement which prevents the arrest.

 

 

8-4

 

Exceptionally Cleared, continued

 

 

Exceptional clearances can be made under one of the following five categories, if ALL FOUR of the above conditions have been met:

 

A - Death of the Offender (e.g., offender accidentally killed or dies of natural causes, suicide of the offender, deathbed confession, offender killed by police or citizen)

B - Prosecution Declined (by the prosecutor after probable cause has already been established)

C - Extradition Denied (offender prosecuted by state or local authorities in another jurisdiction, or prosecuted in another city or state by the Federal government [an attempt is made to return the offender for prosecution, but the other jurisdiction will not allow the release])

D - Victim Refuses to Cooperate (in the prosecution, after probable cause has already been established)

E - Juvenile/No Custody (the handling of a juvenile WITHOUT taking him/her into custody, but rather by oral or written notice given to the parents or legal guardian in a case involving a minor offense)

N - Not Exceptionally Cleared

 

In a multiple-offense incident, the exceptional clearance of one offense clears the entire incident.

An incident cannot be cleared exceptionally if any arrest has been made in connection with the incident. (The incident has already been "cleared by arrest.")

Do not report exceptional clearance information for justifiable homicides, as no crimes have actually occurred for SCIBRS purposes.

The recovery of property does NOT clear a case for SCIBRS purposes.

 

 

 

NOTE: Offender Already in Custody - Instances may occur when an offender already in custody or serving a sentence confesses to an un-cleared crime. This situation is actually a variation of a true clearance byarrest and must NOT be exceptionally cleared. Arrestee data should be reported on the offender (see Multiple Clearance Indicator in ARRESTEE DATA).

 

 

 

8-5

 

EXCEPTIONAL CLEARANCE DATE

If an incident was cleared by exceptional means, the month, day, and year that it was cleared must be reported.

 

 

 

CASE STATUS:*

C - ADMINISTRATIVE CLOSURE

It is recognized that internal policy in various law enforcement agencies permits the discontinuance of an investigation and the administrative closing of a case when all productive investigation has been completed and the case has not been cleared. The Administrative Closure of a case is allowed under the SCIBRS program.

An administrative closure does not count as a "clearance" for SCIBRS. It is simply a designator which allows your agency to list a case as no longer under active investigation. The case remains "active" for SCIBRS purposes.

 

U - UNFOUNDED

The South Carolina SCIBRS program allows the unfounding of certain cases.

A case can be marked "unfounded" ONLY if:

The investigation shows that NO crime occurred, or

The crime is determined to have occurred in another jurisdiction.

A case marked unfounded remains on the data base, but is NOT included in any monthly or annual crime counts.

 

A – ADMINISTRATIVE FILLER

This is an administrative code to be submitted instead of a "blank" whenever the codes "C" or "U" are notsubmitted. The submission of this code should be an automatic function ofyour software whenever "C" or "U" are not entered by your personnel. The "A" does NOT mean that the case is "active".

 

* "Case Status" is a SCIBRS-specific fields.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

8-6

 

 

 

 

SECTION 9

OFFENSE DATA

 

 

 

 

 

 

OFFENSE DATA

The following information requirements apply to each offense within each crime incident.

 

Multiple Offenses: Since in SCIBRS all Group A offenses occurring in an incident are to be reported, care must be taken to identity all offenses involved in an incident. For example, a case might also involve the crimes of rape, motor vehicle theft, and kidnapping. In this case, all three offenses must be coded and reported.

Care must also be taken to ensure that each offense which is reported is a separate and distinct crime, rather than just a part of another offense.

For example, every robbery includes some type of assault (force or threat of force); but because the assault is an element which makes upthe crime of robbery, only the robbery should be reported. If during a robbery, however, the victim is forced to engage in sexual relations, both robbery and forcible rape should be reported, since forced sexual intercourse isnot an element of robbery.

Offense data describe the various types of offenses involved in the incident and are reported for each of the ten most serious Group A offenses in the incident (as determined by the reporting agency). Information on at least one offense must be included in each Group A Incident Report.

 

 

 

IBR OFFENSE CODE

Report the SCIBRS Offense Codes for the most serious Group A offenses (up to 5) involved in the incident. Record each code only ONCE, even though there may have been more than one victim per offense. One setof offense data is to be submitted for each code reported. Victim data will be reported in a later segment.

Example (1): If an incident involved robbery and rape, two offense segments should be reported - one with the SCIBRS offense code"120" (Robbery) and the other with "11A" (Forcible Rape).

NOTE: Even if two females were raped in Example (1) only one set of offense data should be reported with the offense code "11A." The two rape victims will be recorded in the victim segment of the report.

(The term "classification" means the act of determining the appropriate crime categories [or codes] in which to report offenses in UCR. Classification is based upon the facts of the agency's investigation of a crime.UCR/SCIBRS standardized definitions are used to classify incidents. Crimes must NOT be classified by state statutes.)

 

 

9-1

 

 

 

ATTEMPTED/COMPLETED

For each offense within an incident, record whether the crime was

"Attempted" – A, or

"Completed" - C.

Each offense code must indicate whether that offense was attempted or completed within each incident. (If the same offense occurred twice in the same incident, but in one instance it was completed and in the other instance it was only attempted, then "completed" must be marked for that particular offense code.)

Example: If a man tries to rape two women, and succeeds in raping the first, but only makes an attempt to rape the second, who escapes, then "completed" will be marked for the offense code "11A" (Rape).

 

 

 

OFFENDER(S) SUSPECTED OF USING

If an offender is suspected of using alcohol or drugs during or shortly before committing the crime, indicate this by entering an "A" or"D" (or both) in this data element.

If an offender used a computer or computer equipment to commit any part of the crime, indicate this by entering a "C" in this data element.

Up to three (3) codes can be entered for each offense.

A - Alcohol

C - Computer Equipment

D - Drugs/Narcotics

N - None of the Above (Not Applicable)

 

Example (1): Witnesses to an assault reported that the victim and offender were in a bar drinking beer when an argument broke out, and the offender attacked the victim with a knife. Enter A - "Alcohol."

Example (2): A rape victim advised that her attacker bragged that he had been "freebasing" cocaine just prior to the incident. The report should read D - "Drugs/Narcotics."

Example (3): A medical supply warehouse was burglarized and large amounts of Methadone, Morphine, Benzedrine, and Valium were stolen. Enter N – None of the Above. While the drugs were the object of the crime, there was no indication that the offenders USED drugs or narcotics before or during the incident. (That drugs were the object of the burglary willbe recorded within the Property segment.)

Example (4): A computer "hacker" used his personal computer and a telephone modem to gain access to a company's computer and steal proprietary data. Enter C - "Computer Equipment".

 

 

9-2

 

 

 

 

VICTIM SUSPECTED OF USING

In the South Carolina SCIBRS program there is a data element to indicate whether the victim of a crime was suspected of using alcoholor drugs. If a victim is suspected of using alcohol or drugs during or shortly before an incident, indicated this fact by entering "A" or "D" in this data element. Up to two (2) codes may be entered for each victim.

 

A - Alcohol

D - Drugs/Narcotics

N - None of the Above

 

 

 

BIAS MOTIVATION

Because of the difficulty of ascertaining the offender's subjective motivation, bias is to be reported only if investigation reveals sufficient objective facts to lead a reasonable person to conclude that the offender's actions were motivated, in whole or in part, by bias against a racial, religious, ethnic/national origin, disabled, or sexual orientation group.

 

The most appropriate one (1) of the following bias types is to be reported:

 

Racial Bias:

11 - Anti-White

12 - Anti-Black

13 - Anti-American Indian/Alaskan Native

14 - Anti-Asian/Pacific Islander

15 - Anti-Multi-Racial Group

 

Religious Bias:

21 - Anti-Jewish

22 - Anti-Catholic

23 - Anti-Protestant

24 - Anti-Islamic (Moslem)

25 - Anti-Other Religion (Buddhism,

Hinduism, Shintoism, etc.)

26 - Anti-Multi-Religious Group

27 - Anti-Atheist/Agnostic

 

Ethnicity/National Origin Bias:

32 - Anti-Hispanic

33 - Anti-Other Ethnicity/National Origin

 

 

9-3

 

 

 

Bias Motivation, continued

 

 

Sexual Bias:

41 - Anti-Male Homosexual (Gay)

42 - Anti-Female Homosexual (Lesbian)

43 - Anti-Homosexual (Gay and Lesbian)

44 - Anti-Heterosexual

45 - Anti-Bisexual

 

Disability Bias:

51 - Anti-Physical Disability

52 - Anti-Mental Disability

 

88 - Not a Bias Motivated Incident

 

99 - Suspected Bias Motivation Your department suspects that this crime may have been motivatedby bias against a group, but there are not enough facts to code this incident as a Bias Crime. This code is used to indicate a suspected bias motivated incident. It should be re-examined later when new facts are known to the police. An incident using this code is not counted statistically as a Bias Motivated Crime, butshould be used when appropriate.

 

 

 

LOCATION TYPE/PREMISE TYPE

One of the following location/premises types must be entered for each offense code.

In the South Carolina SCIBRS program, the use of TWO location/premise types to describe the scene of an offense is permitted, when a second premise code will significantly enhance the description of the crime scene.

NOTE: PARKING LOTS . The SCIBRS program REQUIRES that a second premise code be used any time Location/Premise code "18 – Parking Lot/Garage" is used.

This requirement is based upon the many data requests from sheriffs and chiefs for detailed information about crimes at schools, churches, shopping malls, etc. Naturally, crimes occurring at these types of locations frequently happen in the parking lots. If only the premise code for "Parking Lot/Garage" were used, then all crimes occurring in any kind of parkingfacility will be "rolled together" under a single group, with no indication of whether they actually happened at a school, church, shopping mall,etc.

NOTE: If an offense occurs at a parking lot/parking garage that is not associated with another premise, such as a school, church, ormall, then the Location/Premise code "18- Parking Lot/Garage" must be entered twice.

 

 

 

9-4

 

 

 

Location Type/Premise Type, continued

 

 

Based upon information requests, South Carolina has also added or modified several location/premise codes.

NOTE: The premise types below are listed in alphabetical order. Some codes

are not in numerical sequence.

 

Location/Premise Types:

01 - Air/Bus/Train Terminal

28 - Apartments/Condominiums

02 - Bank/Savings and Loan (includes other financial institutions)

03 - Bar/Night Club

04 - Church/Synagogue/Mosque (includes other religious buildings)

26 - Colleges/Universities (include college dorms)

05 - Commercial/Office Building

06 - Construction Site

07 - Convenience Store

08 - Department/Discount Store

09 - Drug Store/Doctor's Office/Hospital (includes medical supply building)

10 - Field/Woods

11 - Government/Public Building

12 - Grocery/Supermarket

13 - Highway/Road/Alley (includes streets)

14 - Hotel/Motel/Etc. (includes other temporary lodgings)

15 - Jail/Prison (includes penitentiary)

16 - Lake/Waterway

17 - Liquor Store

27 - Malls/Shopping Malls

18 - Parking Lot/Garage ** This premise type REQUIRES a second premise code.

19 - Rental Storage Facility (includes mini-storage, self-storage buildings)

20 - Residence/Home (include nursing homes)

21 - Restaurant (includes cafeterias)

22 - Schools, **(Grades K - 12 ONLY) (code 26 = Colleges/ Universities)

23 - Service/Gas Station

24 - Specialty Store (includes fur shops, jewelry stores, dress shops, etc.)

25 - Other/Unknown

29 – Highway Rest Areas (NOT picnic areas)

 

NOTE: A motorized vehicle of any sort IS NOT a valid location/premise. The location of the vehicle (Residence, Church Parking Lot, etc.) is to be entered as the premise.

 

 

9-5

 

 

 

Location/Premise Type, continued

 

Example A: An assault started in a bar. "Bar/Night Club" should be entered.

Example B: A woman was getting into her automobile in the parking lot of a shopping mall, when she was pulled behind a dumpster and raped. Since the rape took place in a parking lot, it is necessary to show whatkind of parking lot it was. Therefore, two (2) codes MUST be used, "ParkingLot/Garage" and "Shopping Mall".

If a crime should occur in a parking lot/garage which is not associated with a business, school, church, etc. (e.g. a city parking garage), then the code for "Parking Lot/Garage" should be entered twice, to show that it was not a part of some other location.

Example C: A victim is abducted in a convenience store, then driven to a wooded area and raped. Since each offense in an incident has its own Location/Premise code(s), the Abduction/Kidnapping will show a Location/Premise of "Convenience Store", while the Forcible Rape will show a Location/Premise of "Field/Woods".

 

 

 

NUMBER OF UNITS ENTERED

Enter this information ONLY if the offense is "Burglary/Breaking and Entering" (220) AND the location is either "Hotel/Motel/Etc." (14) or "Rental Storage Facility" (19). In such cases, the number of units entered must be reported. This data element is to show the number of individual rooms, units, suites, storage compartments, etc., that wereentered.

 

NOTE: As explained in the "Burglary" definition, burglaries of motels, mini-storage units, etc., MUST be reported as a single incident under a single case number if the investigation determines that allof the units were entered during a single criminal operation (all of the victims will be entered under the same case number).

 

Example (1): A self-storage building was burglarized and 11 rented storage compartments were forcibly entered. The owner/manager of the building reported the incident to police. Since the offense was Burglary and the Location/Premise was a Rental Storage Facility, the 11 compartments entered must be reported in this data element. (All victims will also be entered under this single case number).

 

 

9-6

 

 

 

Number of Units Entered, continued

 

Example (2): A private residence was burglarized. Again, the offense was burglary, but because the location/premise was not a hotel/motel or rental storage facility, no information should be recorded concerning the number of premises entered.

 

 

 

METHOD OF ENTRY

For the offenses of

 

Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Larceny From a Motor Vehicle

Larceny of Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories

Motor Vehicle Theft

 

This data element must be used to report whether Force or No Force was used by the offender(s) to enter a structure or motor vehicle.

 

F - Force was used or attempted

N - No force was used or attempted

 

A "Forced" entry (F) is where force of any degree or a mechanical contrivance of any kind is used to unlawfully enter a structure or motor vehicle for the purpose of committing a theft or other serious crime.

This act includes entry by use of tools; breaking windows; forcing windows, doors, transoms, or ventilators; cutting screens, walls, or roofs; and where known, the use of master keys, picks, unauthorized keys, celluloid, or other devices which leave no outward mark but are used to force a lock. (Burglary by concealment inside a building followed by an exiting of the structure after the theft is "Forced".)

A "FORCED" (F) entry must be reported any time a locking mechanism of any sort is defeated by any means whatsoever.

An "UNFORCED" (N) entry involves unlawful entry through an UNLOCKED door or window.

If BOTH forcible and nonforcible entries were involved in the crime, the offense should be reported using code "F" - Forced.

 

 

9-7

 

 

 

TYPE CRIMINAL ACTIVITY

This data element is meant to describe in common language the type of activity associated with certain crimes. It must be used with the offenses of:

 

Counterfeiting/Forgery

Stolen Property Offenses

Drug/Narcotic Violations

Drug Equipment Violations

Gambling Equipment Violations

Pornography/Obscene Material

Weapon Law Violations

 

Enter up to three (3) of the activity types listed below for each of the offenses above.

 

B - Buying/Receiving

C - Cultivating/Manufacturing/Publishing/Producing

D - Distributing/Selling (**includes PWID, Possession With Intent to Distribute)**

E - Exploiting Children (children are used in the commission of the crime)

O - Operating/Promoting/Assisting

P - Possessing/Concealing (**includes Simple Possession**)

T - Transporting/Transmitting/Importing

U - Using/Consuming

 

Example A: A man is arrested for possessing more than one gram of crack cocaine, and charged with Possession With Intent to Distribute. The offense code will be Drug/Narcotic Violation. The Type Criminal Activity code will be "D - Distributing/Selling".

Example B: An ongoing investigation reveals that a local drug dealer is using two ten-year-old boys as "mules" for moving drugs to different parts of town. The incident offense code will be Drug/Narcotic Violation; the Type Criminal Activity codes will be "D - Distributing/ Selling" and "E - Exploiting Children".

Example C: The offenders published and sold pornographic photographs they took ofchildren. Because up to three types of activity can be reported, "C- Cultivating/Manufacturing/Publishing/Producing"; "D - Distributing/ Selling";and "E - Exploiting Children" should be recorded.

 

 

9-8

 

 

 

Type Criminal Activity, continued

 

 

TYPE CRIMINAL ACTIVITY - GANG VIOLENCE

The Gang Violence codes listed here are extensions of the Type Criminal Activity codes listed above.

The codes are meant to identify any violent crimes which are the result of violent gang activity.

 

The Gang Violence Type Criminal Activity codes must be used with the offenses of:

 

Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter

Negligent Homicide

Kidnaping/Abduction

Robbery

Forcible Rape

Forcible Sodomy

Sexual Assault With an Object

Forcible Fondling

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Intimidation

 

Enter up to two (2) Gang Violence activity types for the offenses listed

above.

 

J - Juvenile (Youth) Gang (membership primarily juveniles)

G - Other Gang

N - No Gang Involvement ("N" includes "unknown whether gang involved.)

 

Definition of "Gang": A gang, for SCIBRS reporting purposes, is defined as an ongoing organization, association, or group of three (3) or more persons, who have a common activity characterized by involvement in a pattern of criminal or delinquent conduct. (More simply, an organized group which is involved in criminal activity.)

Juvenile (youth) gangs often have identifying names, dress codes, "colors", tattoos, etc.

As defined above, a "gang" must be an organized association of persons, not just a group of people who "hang out" together.

 

 

9-9

 

 

 

TYPE WEAPON/FORCE INVOLVED

Up to three (3) types of weapons/force used by the offender in committing certain crimes can be entered.

 

Type Weapon/Force codes must be used with the following offenses:

Murder Negligent Homicide
Justifiable Homicide Kidnapping/Abduction
Forcible Rape Forcible Sodomy
Sexual Assault With an Object Forcible Fondling
Robbery Aggravated Assault
Simple Assault Extortion/Blackmail
Weapon Law Violation

 

Up to three (3) of the following weapons can be entered for each offense:

11 - Firearm (type unknown) (Do not use this as a "catch all".)

12 - Handgun

13 - Rifle

14 - Shotgun

15 - Other Firearm (machine gun, mortar, etc.)

20 - Knife/Cutting Instrument (ax, screwdriver, knife, glass, etc.)

30 - Blunt Object (club, hammer, etc.)

35 - Motor Vehicle (when used as weapon)

40 - Hands, Personal Weapons (i.e., hands, fists, feet, teeth, etc.)

50 - Poison (not gas)

60 - Explosives

65 - Fire/Incendiary Device

70 - Drugs/Narcotics/Sleeping Pills

90 - Other (any weapon or force not fitting the above listed weapons)

91 - Drowning

92 - Strangulation/Hanging/Suffocation/Gas/etc.

93 - Pushed/Thrown From High Place

95 - Unknown (rarely used)

99 - None

NOTE: Hands, feet, etc. are reported as "40", NOT as "99".

 

When reporting the weapons used, select the most specific weapon-type listed, e.g., a revolver MUST be reported as "Handgun" rather than "Firearm."

If a weapon was used that could be employed in several ways, choose the weapon-type that indicates how the weapon was used. For example, if a bottle was used in the commission of a murder, report "Blunt Object" if the victim was beaten, or "Knife/Cutting Instrument" if the victim was cut or stabbed with a broken bottle.

 

 

9-10

 

Type Weapon, continued

 

Example: Three robbers held up a bank. One was armed with a revolver, the second had a sawed-off single barrel shotgun, and the third had a bolt action rifle. The weapons reported should be: "Handgun"; "Shotgun"; and "Rifle."

 

 

AUTOMATIC/SEMI-AUTOMATIC FIREARM

A – Fully Automatic

C – Semi-Automatic

If the weapon was a FULLY AUTOMATIC firearm, then the code "A" for "Fully Automatic" along with the firearm type MUST beentered.

A fully automatic firearm is defined as any firearm which shoots, or is designed to shoot, more than one shot at a time with a single pullof the trigger, automatically firing and reloading itself as long as the trigger is held back.

If the weapon is a SEMI-AUTOMATIC firearm, then the code "S" for "Semi-Automatic" MUST be entered.

A semi-automatic firearm is one designed to fire one shot with each pull of the trigger, while automatically reloading itself (WITHOUT theuse of manual bolts, slides, revolving cylinders, etc.).

Many handguns, hunting rifles, and shotguns are semi-automatic.

 

NOTE: Whenever codes are being entered by someone other than the reporting officer, IT IS VERY IMPORTANT that the reporting officers make clear on the incident report whether or not a firearm is Fully Automatic or Semi-Automatic, or neither. While the reporting officer may understandthat a "Smith & Wesson Model 59" is a semi-automatic handgun, the person who is entering the report into the computer MAY NOT know this. Therefore, it is IMPORTANT that the reporting officer use either "A" or "S" or some other standard notation to let the person entering the report know positively whether the firearm is "A", "S", or neither.

The danger to officers and citizens from these kinds of firearms is serious, and the information gathered with this data element should be of extreme interest to all reporting officers.

 

 

 

9-11

 

 

 

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCE CODES

(Sometimes called "ADDITIONAL SUBCODES")

DO NOT SKIP OVER THESE CODES!

These are important "special" circumstance codes which allow your agency to code significant additional data about a crime. They allow you to make specific searches within your own system, or through the state SCIBRS system. These codes MUST be used whenever applicable in order to better describe criminal activity. These codes are specific to the South Carolina SCIBRS system. These circumstances are required where applicable.

 

Special Circumstance Codes may be used with ANY type of offense.

 

Up to three (3) Special Circumstance Codes ("Additional Subcodes") may be entered for any incident. You should use as many as necessaryto best describe a criminal event. It is important to use these descriptive codes even if you have already used a similar code in another data field.

 

B - Bomb Threat

C - Carjacking (when a vehicle. is taken from a driver or passenger in an armed robbery)

G - Gas "Drive-off"

H - Hate/Bias Motivated

I - Offender Mentally Ill/Unstable (suspected)

J - Joy Ride with Motor Vehicle

M - Mutilated (suspected) (Any unusual damage to body.)

P - Assault Victim is Police Officer

S - Offender Committed Suicide

X - Safe Cracking

Y - Youth Gang Activity (by well known/established, easily identified gangs [gang names, colors, insignia,

etc.] - NOT by youths who just "hang out" together)

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

9-12

 

 

 

SECTION 10

PROPERTY DATA

DRUG DATA

 

(Drug Data in this segment are for the incident report.

Drug data for arrest charges are shown in the Arrestee Data segment.)

 

 

 

PROPERTY DATA

 

Property data are collected to describe the type, value, and quantity of property involved in the incident. Property information is to be submitted separately for each type of property loss, i.e., burned, counterfeited,

forged, destroyed, recovered, seized, etc. A property segment MUST be submitted whenever any of the following offenses are reported.

Arson

Bribery

Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Counterfeiting/Forgery

Destruction/Damage/Vandalism of Property

Drug/Narcotic Offenses

Drug Equipment Violations

Embezzlement

Extortion/Blackmail

Fraud Offenses

Gambling Offenses

Kidnapping/Abduction

Larceny/Theft Offenses

Motor Vehicle Theft

Robbery

Stolen Property Offenses

 

 

TYPE PROPERTY LOSS/ETC.

Record the type of property loss, recovery, etc., which occurred in an incident as:

 

1 - None

2 - Burned - (includes damage caused by fighting an arson fire)

3 - Counterfeited/Forged

4 - Destroyed/Damaged/Vandalized

5 - Recovered - (property that was previously stolen)

6 - Seized - (property that was NOT previously stolen)

7 - Stolen/Etc. - (includes ransomed, defrauded, bribed, etc.)

8 - Unknown

 

One of the above "Type Property Loss/Etc." categories must be used to describe each type of loss, recovery, seizure, etc. associated with any incident.

 

 

NOTE: A single incident may have more than one loss/ etc. type. For instance, an incident may show property stolen and recovered; another incident may show some property stolen and other property burned. Various combinations are possible in any single incident.

NOTE: Illegal drugs confiscated during narcotics operations and arrests must be shown as "Seized" (NOT "Recovered").

 

10-1

 

 

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION

For each type of property loss/etc., up to ten (10) property descriptions (types or groups of property) can be reported. If more than ten types of property are involved, the nine (9) property descriptions (types/groups)

with the highest group values should be reported as individual property descriptions; all other property should be grouped under thetype loss/etc. "Other".

NOTE: Some local software packages have routines which automatically group and add property for IBR. If your agency's software does this, be sure that your vendor has programmed it to do this as described above.

 

 

** NOTE: The property types are listed in alphabetical order, therefore, some code numbers are not in numerical sequence. Also, all motor vehicles have been grouper under the heading "Motor Vehicles", and all types of structures have been grouped under the heading "Structures".

 

The property description categories are:

01 - Aircraft - airplanes, dirigibles, gliders, etc.

02 - Alcohol - alcoholic beverages, e.g., beer, wine

04 - Bicycles - includes tandem bicycles, unicycles, and tricycles

39 - Boats/Watercraft - motorboats, sailboats, houseboats, etc.

06 - Clothes/Furs - wearing apparel for human use, including accessories such as belts, shoes, etc.

07 - Computer Hardware/Software - computer, computer peripherals, e.g., tape and disk drives, printer;

and storage media, i.e., magnetic tapes, diskettes, etc.

08 - Consumable Goods - expendable items used by humans for nutrition, enjoyment, or hygiene, e.g.,

food, beverages, grooming products, cigarettes, gasoline, firewood

09 - Credit/Debit Cards - includes automatic teller machine cards

10 - Drugs/Narcotics - use for legal drugs stolen, etc.; use for illegal narcotics seized

11 - Drug/Narcotic Equipment - paraphernalia, or other equipment used in producing, growing, using, etc.

12 - Farm Equipment - tractors, combines, etc.

13 - Firearms - weapons that fire a shot by force of an explosion, i.e., handguns, rifles, shotguns, etc., but

not "BB," pellet, or gas-powered guns

14 - Gambling Equipment - gambling paraphernalia

15 - Heavy Construction/Industrial Equipment - cranes, bulldozers, steamrollers, oil-drilling rigs, etc.

16 - Household Goods - beds, chairs, desks, sofas, tables, refrigerators, stoves, washers/dryers, air

conditioning and heating equipment, etc.

17 - Jewelry/Precious Metals - bracelets, necklaces, rings, watches, etc., and gold, silver, platinum, etc.

18 - Livestock - living farm animals, e.g., cattle, chickens, hogs, horses, sheep, but NOT household pets

such as dogs and cats

19 - Merchandise - items for sale which do not fit any other category ** NOT A "CATCH ALL"!

20 - Money - legal tender, i.e., coins and paper currency

 

 

10-2

 

 

Property Descriptions, continued

 

Motor Vehicles:

03 - Automobiles - sedans, coupes, station wagons, convertibles, taxicabs, and other similar motor

vehicles which serve the primary purpose of transporting people

37 - Trucks - motor vehicles which are specifically designed, but not necessarily used, to transport cargo

05 - Buses - motor vehicles which are specifically designed, but not necessarily used, to transport groups of

people; includes school buses, church buses, etc.

28 - Recreational Vehicles - motor vehicles which are specifically designed but not necessarily used, to

transport people and also provide them temporary lodging for recreational purposes (motor homes)

24 - Other Motor Vehicles - any motor vehicles other than automobiles, buses, recreational vehicles, or

trucks (e.g., motorcycles, motor scooters, trail bikes, mopeds, snowmobiles, golf carts)

21 - Negotiable Instruments - any document, other than currency, which is payable without restriction, e.g.,

endorsed checks, endorsed money orders, and endorsed traveler's checks; bearer checks and bonds

22 - Nonnegotiable Instruments - documents requiring further action to become negotiable, e.g.,

unendorsed checks, unendorsed money orders; stocks and bonds

23 - Office-type Equipment - typewriters, calculators, cash registers, copying machines, etc.

25 - Purses/Handbags/Wallets

26 - Radio/TVs/VCRs - includes radios, televisions, videotape recorders, high-fidelity and stereo equipment,

compact disk players, etc.

27 - Recordings-Audio/Visual - phonograph records, compact disks, tape recordings, cassettes, etc.

Structures:

29 - Single Occupancy Dwellings - houses, townhouses, duplexes mobile homes, or other private

dwellings which are occupied by a single person, family, housemates, or other group

30 - Other Dwellings - any other residential dwellings NOT meeting the definition of "Single Occupancy

Dwellings," e.g., apartments, tenements, temporary living quarters, such as hotels, motels, inns

31 - Other Commercial/Business - stores, office buildings, restaurants, etc.

32 - Industrial/Manufacturing - Factories, plants, mills, etc.

33 - Public/Community - colleges, hospitals, jails, libraries, meeting halls, passenger terminals, religious

buildings, schools, sports arenas, etc.

34 - Storage - barns, garages, storehouses, warehouses, etc.

35 - Other - any other structures not fitting the other structures descriptions, e.g., out-buildings,

monuments, buildings under construction

36 - Tools - hand tools and power tools

38 - Vehicle Part/Accessories - motor vehicle batteries, engines, transmissions, heaters, hubcaps, tires,

manufacturers' emblems, license plates, side mirrors, radios, antennas, tape decks, etc.

77 - Other - all other property not fitting the above specific descriptions (This category MUST NOT be used

as a "CATCH ALL" when more specific categories are available)

88 - Pending Inventory - property description unknown until an inventory is conducted - This category

MUST be updated as soon as the victim's inventory is completed.

 

 

10-3

 

 

 

 

10-4

 

VALUE OF PROPERTY

Report the total dollar values of the property which was burned, stolen, destroyed, etc., as a result of the incident. Up to ten values can be entered to match the up to ten property descriptions. If more than ten types of property are involved, the values of the nine most valuable properties are to be reported; then, the total value of the remaining properties are to be combined and reported as one total under the category "Other".

There is no requirement to list the dollar value of any drugs/narcotics "seized" in a Drug/Narcotic Violation offense (the type drug andmeasurement will be shown in a later data element). If the offense was "Drug/Narcotic Violation, - 35A" the property description was "Drugs/Narcotics, - 10" and the type property loss, "Seized, - 6", no dollar valuation is allowed for SCIBRS. (Vendors may perform special programming to allow local agencies to collect dollar values for seized drugs, as long as they are not submitted to SCIBRS.)

However, when drugs are targets in other types of crime (e.g., they were stolen in a burglary or burned in an arson) their dollar value is to be reported as stolen, recovered, burned, etc.

 

Guidelines For Property Valuation

Questions frequently arise as to how to determine the value of property involved in a criminal incident. The following guidelines are suggested:

1. Use fair market value for articles which are subject to depreciation because of wear and tear, age, or other factors which cause the value to decrease with use.

2. Use cost to the merchant (wholesale cost) of goods recovered, seized, stolen, etc., from retail establishments, warehouses, etc. Inother words, use the dollar value representing the actual cash loss to the victim without any markup or profit added.

3. Use victim's valuation of items such as jewelry, watches, and other similar goods which decrease in value slightly or not at all with use or age.

4. Use replacement cost or actual cash cost to victim for new or almost new clothes, auto accessories, bicycles, etc.

5. When the victim obviously exaggerates the value of stolen/ destroyed/damaged property for insurance or other purposes, common sense and good judgment will dictate a fair market value to be placed on the stolen items bylaw enforcement. In most instances, the victim's valuation can be accepted.

 

 

 

NOTE: The theft of nonnegotiable instruments such as traveler's checks, personal checks, money orders, stocks, bonds, food stamps, etc., should be entered, but NO value recorded. Negotiable instruments such as bonds payable to the bearer, etc., are valued at the current market price at the time of the theft, seizure, etc.

 

 

NOTE: Values should be rounded to the nearest whole dollar.

 

 

 

 

10-5

 

 

NOTE: Often the condition of the property is different at recovery than it was when stolen. The market value AT THE TIME OF RECOVERY MUST be used, even though it is far less than the value reported at the time of the theft. (For example, the recovery of a $25,000 automobile which has been stripped and burned must be valued at only a small fraction of the originalvalue - perhaps only the worth of the scrap metal. The logic here is that a $25,000 dollar car was NOT returned to the owner or the insurance company.)

 

NOTE: The value of property recovered MUST NOT be greater than the value reported stolen.

 

NOTE: An agency must report ONLY the value of property stolen in its jurisdiction. Likewise, the value of property recovered will include ONLY property originally reported as stolen in its own jurisdiction. It does not matter who recovers the property or where it was recovered. Even though another police agency recovers the stolen property, the jurisdiction from which the property was stolen MUST report the recovery. This procedure applies to all stolen property, including motor vehicles.

Some agencies find it valuable to maintain separate records on property recovered by them for other jurisdictions. If you wish to collect this kind of data, you must have your software vendor or programmer set up the appropriate codes and programming, which will insure that the information is NOTforwarded to SCIBRS.

 

 

DATE RECOVERED

If previously stolen property is recovered, the month, day, and year of its recovery is to be reported. Up to 10 dates of recovery canbe reported to match each of the up to 10 property descriptions in the incident. If there is more than one date of recovery for the same type of property, report the earliest date.

Example: On March 20, 1995, three cars were stolen from a used car lot. One was recovered on July 24 and another on August 5. Thedate reported should be July 24, 1995.

 

 

NUMBER OF STOLEN MOTOR VEHICLES

For all Motor Vehicle Theft offenses (offense code 240), report the total number of motor vehicles stolen in the incident. Up to 99 vehicles can be reported per incident. (If number stolen is unknown, enter "00".)

 

NOTE: This data element can be used ONLY when one of the offense codes in the incident is 240 (Motor Vehicle Theft). (It can NOT be used when a motor vehicle is taken in another type of offense, such as Fraud, Embezzlement, Robbery, etc. This is a frequent software error.)

 

Example: Three cars were stolen from a used car lot. This data element would read "03."

 

 

10-6

 

NUMBER OF RECOVERED MOTOR VEHICLES

For all Motor Vehicle Theft offenses (offense code 240), record how many motor vehicles were recovered in the incident. Up to 99 can be reported. (If number recovered is unknown, enter "00".)

 

NOTE: This data element can be used ONLY when one of the offense codes in the incident is 240 (Motor Vehicle Theft). (It can NOT be used when a motor vehicle is recovered in another type of offense, such as Fraud, Embezzlement, Robbery, etc. This is a frequent software error.)

 

 

Example: Three cars stolen from a used car lot were recovered. This data element would read "03".

 

 

10-7

 

DRUG DATA

 

NOTE ON DRUG, QUANTITIES, MEASUREMENTS: The three data elements listed next, "Suspected Drug Type", "Estimated Drug Quantity", and "Type Drug Measurement", are listed and discussed as separate items so that they may be easily explained and defined. Showing the information in this manner has often made the information seem overly complex. In fact, most local software packages have designed their screens in such a manner as to greatly simplify the entry of drug data. Most drug entry screens are simple, and usually incorporate the Type, Quantity, and Measurement in an entry format similar to:

 

Drug Type Quantity Measurement
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ _ _ _ _

 

or sometimes:

 

Drug Type Quantity Fraction Measurement
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

 

 

Example:

Drug Type Quantity Measurement
A _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _22 . 5 _ _ GM
E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _10 . 5 _ _ LB
  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . _ _ _ _ _

 

 

10-8

 

SUSPECTED DRUG TYPE

Because it is often difficult to determine the true identity of drugs or narcotics at the time an initial incident report is prepared, only the "suspected type of drug" is to be reported. "Suspected Drug Type" is

required only when one of the offense codes is "Drug/ Narcotic Violations" (35A). No drug type is required when drugs or narcotics are burned, stolen, etc., in connection with other offenses, such as arson, burglary, larceny, etc.

NOTE: Drug codes may NOT be in alphabetical order within groupings.

 

 

The SUSPECTED DRUG TYPES are:

 

A - "Crack" Cocaine

B - Cocaine - all forms except "crack"

 

E - Marijuana

C - Hashish

 

D - Heroin

F - Morphine

G - Opium

H - Other Narcotics - Codeine; Demerol; Dihydromorphinone or Dilaudid; Hydrocodone or Percodan;

Methadone; etc.

 

I - LSD

J - PCP

K - Other Hallucinogens - BMDA or "White Acid"; DMT; MDA; MDMA; Mescaline or Peyote; Psilocybin;

STP; etc.

 

L - Amphetamines/Methamphetamines

M - Other Stimulants - Adipex, Fastine, and Ionamin (Derivatives of Phentermine); Benzedrine; Didrex;

Methylphenidate or Ritalin; Phenmetrazine or Preludin; Tenuate; etc.

 

N - Barbiturates

O - Other Depressants - Glutethimide or Doriden; Methaqualone or Quaalude; Pentazocine or Talwin; etc.

 

P - Other Drugs - Antidepressants, i.e., Elavil, Triavil, Tofranil, etc.; Aromatic Hydrocarbons; Propoxyphene or Darvon; Tranquilizers, i.e., Chlordiazepoxide or Librium, Diazepam or Valium; etc.

 

 

10-9

 

Suspected Drug Types, continued

 

U - Unknown Type Drug - Should seldom be used

X - Over Three Drug Types - Up to three drug/narcotic types can be sent to the state SCIBRS program. If more than three types of drugs are involved, then the two most important drug types are to be reported

as specific drug types (as determined by the reporting agency, taking into account the quantity, value, and deadliness of thedrugs) . The remaining drugs will not be forwarded to the state SCIBRS program, but a code "X" will be sent to indicate to the system that "Over Three Drug Types." were seized by your agency in a single incident.

NOTE: Local software packages should have programming in place to generate the "X" code automatically. If your software has such a routine, you must be sure that your vendor is generating the information according to the rule above. Also, if your software does not automatically generate the "X" for more than three drug types, you may want to contact them and request this feature, since it simplifies data entry.

 

Example: In a drug case, the following drugs were seized: (1) 1.5 kilograms of "crack", (2) 20.3 pounds of marijuana; (3) 2.125 liquid ounces of morphine; and (4) 200 Valium capsules. Because of their quantity, your agency decided that the "crack" and marijuana are the most important drugs, and therefore, should be reported specifically. The morphine and Valium are not reported to the state SCIBRS system, but an "X" is submitted as the third drug code.

 

 

ESTIMATED DRUG QUANTITY

Because of problems in determining the "street value" of drugs or narcotics, NO monetary value is to be reported when they are seized in connection with Drug/Narcotic Violations. However, in order to obtainsome measure of the drug problem, the "Estimated Quantity" of seized drugs or narcotics is to be reported for each Drug/Narcotic Violation where drugs are seized. Reasonable ESTIMATES made at the time of the initial incident report are accepted by the state SCIBRS program. It is understood that these estimates may not agree with precise measurements made at a later time. (Exact measurements may be obtained by your agency after a laboratory or other evaluation is made. You may later update the quantity sent to the SCIBRS program, or let it remain as sent if the final determination is reasonably near the "estimated" quantity originally sent to the SCIBRS program.)

 

One quantity can be entered for each "Suspected Drug Type" reported. If more than three drugs or narcotics are involved, the quantities ofthe two most important (as determined by the reporting agency taking into account their quantity, value, and deadliness) are to be reported. No quantity indicator is allowed for the "Over Three Drug Types" (X) category.

Estimated drug quantities may be entered with up to nine (9) whole numbers, and up to three (3) decimal places (999999999.999).

 

NOTE: "Trace", or microscopic amounts may be reported as "0.001 GM".

 

 

10-10

 

 

Estimated Drug Quantity, continued

 

 

TYPE DRUG MEASUREMENT

Each individual drug type and quantity will have code to indicate the unit of measurement.

Measurements can be indicated by any the following categories:

 

Metric:

GM - Gram

KG - Kilogram

ML - Milliliter

LT - Liter

 

Standard:

OZ - Ounce

LB - Pound

FO - Fluid Ounce

GL - Gallon

 

Individual:

DU - Dosage Unit (Number of capsules, pills, tablets, etc.)

NP - Number of Plants (e.g., marijuana plants, bushes)

 

NOTE: "Crack" cocaine MUST be reported in either Metric or Standard measurements. "Crack" must NOT be reported as DU (Dosage Units), since each "rock" of crack may be of a different weight.

 

NOTE: Your agency can choose to report either Metric or Standard measurements on a case by case basis. The only FBI edit governing the choice states that Metric and Standard measurements can not be used together in any single incident.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

10-11

 

 

 

 

SECTION 11

VICTIM DATA

 

 

 

VICTIM DATA

 

Victim data are collected to describe the characteristics of each of the victims involved in the incident.

A separate set of victim data is to be submitted for EACH of the victims involved in the incident (up to 999). There MUST be at least one set of victim data for each crime incident.

 

 

VICTIM SEQUENCE NUMBER

Each victim in an incident must be assigned a sequence number from 001 to 999. A separate set of victim data is to be submitted for each numbered victim.

The sequence numbers provide unique identifiers when there are multiple victims in a single incident.

For example, if three victims were involved in an incident, one victim would be assigned the number 001, the next victim would be designated 002, and the last victim 003.

A victim may be associated with one offense, or with up to ten offenses. In the example above, each victim could be linked to the same offense code, or each one linked to separate offense codes. The Sequence Numberprovides the unique identifier and the link to the offenses.

Some assault situations can pose difficulties in distinguishing victims from offenders. If a number of persons are involved in an assault situation, and law enforcement investigations cannot establish the aggressors from the victims, then enter ALL persons involved as both Victims andOffenders. Similar situations often occur with domestic disputes, etc. (SeeRelationship code "VO" later in the manual.)

 

 

VICTIM CONNECTED TO SCIBRS OFFENSE CODE(S)

For each victim, enter the 10 most serious Group A offenses which were perpetrated against each victim during the incident (as determined by your agency).

EVERY VICTIM MAY NOT BE AFFECTED BY EVERY OFFENSE WITHIN AN INCIDENT. ENTER FOR EACH VICTIM ONLY THOSE OFFENSES AFFECTING HIM/HER.

 

Example: In case number 123654, the husband (Victim 001) was murdered and robbed, and the wife (Victim 002) was kidnapped, raped, and robbed. The connection would be:

Victim 001 connected to offense codes 09A, 120

Victim 002 connected to offense codes 100, 11A, 120.

 

 

11-1

 

Victim Connected to SCIBRS Offense Code, continued

 

 

Your software should have provisions for easily connecting Victims to Offense Codes by using victim sequence numbers.

 

 

TYPE OF VICTIM

The type of victim is to be reported for each numbered victim. Only one of the following types is to be reported for each victim:

I - Individual

B - Business

F - Financial Institutions, Banks

G - Government

R - Religious Organization

S - Society/Public Note: Vendors should "hard code" Victim Type "S" for all Crimes Against Society

O - Other

U - Unknown

 

Example: During a bank robbery, the offender pointed a gun at two tellers and demanded and received money. Report three Victims:

Victim 001 would be the bank (Type Victim, Financial Institution);

Victims 002 and 003 would be the tellers (Victim Type, Individual).

 

 

AGE OF VICTIM

If the victim was a person (Victim Type, Individual), his/her age is to be reported either as an exact age, a range of years, or as unknown. An age is required for each "Individual" victim.

The following are the required age categories:

 

NN - Under 24 hours (neonate)

NB - 1-6 days old

BB - 7-364 days old

01 - 98 years old

99 – Any age over 98 years old must be reported to SCIBRS as "99"

00 – Unknown age (rarely used)

 

NOTE: All software MUST provide for the Victim Age codes shown above, as well as for victim age ranges. If software does not provide forall of these age codes as well as for age ranges, then that software is NOT compliant with SCIBRS and NIBRS reporting requirements.

 

 

11-2

 

Age of Victim, continued

 

NOTE: When the exact age is known, enter it in the first two positions, and leave the last two positions blank:

Example: "18 _ _" is correct; "1818" is NOT correct.

 

AGE RANGE - If the exact age is unknown, an approximate "age range" can be reported. Any range in years is allowed as long as it is reasonable. A reasonable age range is one that is useful to law enforcement.

Example: 20-30 is reasonable and useful to law enforcement;

10 to 90 is NOT "reasonable", and should be reported as "Unknown", "00").

 

Example: If a deceased female victim appeared to be a teenager, the reported age might be "1319".

 

"00 - Unknown" should NEVER be used for a victim's age UNLESS a body is unidentified and also too decomposed to estimate a reasonable age range.

 

 

SEX OF VICTIM

If the victim was a person (Individual), his/her sex is to be indicated as:

 

M - Male

F - Female

U - Unknown

 

"Unknown" should NEVER be used for a victim's sex UNLESS a body is unidentified and also too decomposed todetermine the sex.

 

 

11-3

 

RACE OF VICTIM

If the victim is a person (Individual), his/her race is to be reported as one of the following:

 

W - White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. (Persons who are sometimes very loosely referred to as "Mexican", "Cuban", or"Latino" are usually classified as "White". However, see "Ethnic Origin of Victim" on the following page.)

 

B - Black - A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa, south of the Sahara Desert.

 

I - American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who maintainscultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

 

A - Asian or Pacific Islander - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, but is not limited to, China, India, Pakistan, Japan, Korea, Viet Nam, the Philippine Islands, Hawaii, and Samoa.

 

U - Unknown - "Unknown" should NEVER be used UNLESS a body is unidentified and also too decomposed to determine a race.

 

 

NOTE: Many persons consider themselves to be part of more than one racial category. Officers should be sensitive to the concerns and desires of individuals, but should also make every reasonable effort to place persons in one of the first four categories, above, using experience and common sense. (Common experience seems to indicate that most people consider themselves to be members of some easily identifiable racial group, even though their family histories may include individuals from more than one of the categories given above. A rule of thumb is to describe a person just as you would if you were issuing a BOLO.)

"Unknown" should be used very rarely, but may infrequently be used in unusual situations.

 

 

11-4

 

ETHNIC ORIGIN OF VICTIM

If the victim was a person (Victim Type, Individual), his/her Ethnic Origin is reported as:

 

H – Hispanic Ethnic Origin - A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, REGARDLESS of RACE.

N - Not of Hispanic Ethnic Origin

U - Unknown

 

NOTE: A person of Hispanic Ethnic Origin may be of ANY Race; W, B, I, or A.

"Hispanic", "Latino", "Cuban" or "Mexican" are NOT race categories. Persons of Hispanic Ethnic Origin may be of any race.

The categories of "Race" and "Ethnicity" are NOT interchangeable.

A victim's Race (W, B, I, A) must be coded FIRST; then choose an Ethnic Origin code.

 

 

Example: One victim, who is White, may be of Hispanic ethnic origin, while a second victim, who is Black, may ALSO be of Hispanic ethnic origin.

As in determining a person's race, experience and common sense should be used in a reasonable effort to determine a person's Ethnic Origin.

 

NOTE: The racial and ethnic origin categories used in the UCR Program were adopted from the Statistical Policy Handbook published by the Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, U. S. Department of Commerce.

 

 

 

11-5

 

RESIDENT STATUS OF VICTIM

If the victim was a person (Victim Type, Individual), a Resident Status code must be entered to indicate the victim's residency in relation to the location of the crime. The categories are:

 

J - (Jurisdiction) - The victim is a resident of THIS JURISDICTION, (where the crime occurred);

S - (State) - The victim IS a resident of S.C., but NOT a resident of your jurisdiction;

O - (Outside) - The victim's residence is OUTSIDE South Carolina.

U - (Unknown) - The victim's residency can not be determined.

 

 

County and State law enforcement agencies should base their determinations of residency on the town, city, or community where the crime occurred rather than their broader geographical jurisdictions.

 

Examples 1-2: Mr. Jones, the victim, resides in the city of Greenville, in Greenville County, in the state of South Carolina;

1. Mr. Jones is robbed in the city of Greenville, where he resides, and the Greenville City Police Department takes the incident report. The Resident Status code will be "J" - meaning that he lives in the jurisdictionwhere the crime occurred.

2. Mr. Jones is robbed in Greenville County, but not inside a city limit. The Greenville County Sheriff's Department is the primary law enforcement agency for un-incorporated areas in the county, and for towns which have no organized police forces. The Sheriff's Office takes the incident report. The Resident Status code will be "S" - meaning that he lives in S.C., but that he is a resident in the jurisdiction of another recognized law enforcement agency (Greenville City).

 

Example 3. Mr. Smith is a resident of Dallas, Texas. He is robbed in the city of Camden, S.C. The Camden City Police Department takes the incident report. The Resident Status code will be "O" - meaning that thevictim lives outside the state of South Carolina.

 

 

11-6

 

Resident Status of Victim, continued

 

 

Example 4. A human skeleton is found by hunters. There is evidence that the victim has been murdered. Extended investigation is unable to determine the name or any other information about the victim. The Resident Status code will be "U" - meaning that it can not be determined where the victim lived.

 

(When college campus law enforcement departments determine the residency status of college students, only persons living "on campus" (i.e.,in dormitories, etc.) would be considered "Residents" if victimized withinthe confines of the school property.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT/HOMICIDE CIRCUMSTANCES

The circumstances surrounding Aggravated Assaults and Homicide Offenses (Murder, Negligent Manslaughter, Justifiable Homicide) are to bereported for each victim of one of these crimes.

 

It is important to remember that the use of these codes is intended to accomplish one thing - the reduction of investigative informationto one or two brief codes. That is, to explain with codes what the investigating officer knows about the circumstances surrounding the assault or homicide.

 

NOTE: The selection of circumstance codes should be based on information known to law enforcement officers as a result of their investigation, NOT decisions of a solicitor, grandjury, coroner's inquest, or other agency outside law enforcement. Always select the MOST descriptive circumstances as determined by your agency's investigation.

 

 

11-7

 

MURDER/NON-NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER and

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT CIRCUMSTANCES

 

Up to two (2) of the following can be recorded for each Aggravated Assault or Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter victim:

 

01 - Argument - Arguments about anything not specified in another code in this table (general arguments, arguments over money, animals, etc. See more specific codes below.).

 

02 - Assault on Law Enforcement Officer (see LEOKA data below) - Any Aggravated Assault or Murder where the victim is a law enforcement officer.

 

03 - Drug Dealing - Assaults or homicides where the attack is related to the unlawful manufacture, sale, distribution, etc. of illegal drugs. This code is NOT meant to capture information about the USE of drugs by victims or offenders, but rather about attacks associated with illegal drug dealing operations (large or small). They often involve "turf" battles, "rip offs", etc.

 

04 - Gangland (Organized Crime involvement) - Assaults or homicides related to the activities of well established organizedcrime organizations (Mafia, etc.).

 

05 - Youth Gang - Assaults or homicides related to the activities of well established, easily identifiable youth gangs or "street gangs" (gangs which have a clear organization, well known insignia or colors, etc.; NOT simply a group of young people who "hang out" together).

 

06 - Lovers Quarrel - Aggravated assaults or homicides resulting from arguments related to the romantic, marital, or sexual relationship between two or more people. This circumstance frequently involves a third party or suspected third party. Use this code ONLY when the argument is related to the marital, romantic, or sexual relationship itself. Homosexual relationships are included. The simple factthat the victim and offender are lovers does not necessarily mean that this circumstance code should be used, since lovers could be arguing about money,not their relationship.

 

 

 

11-8

 

Murder, Aggravated Assault Circumstances, continued

 

 

07 - Mercy Killing

 

08 - Other Serious Crime Involved (Robbery, Burglary, etc.) - Use this circumstance code when the aggravated assault or homicide is a part of another ongoing serious crime , such as a Robbery, Burglary, Rape, Auto Theft, etc. In these reports, the incident must ALWAYS include one or more offense codes IN ADDITION TO the aggravated assault code or murder code. (For example, if a store owner is murdered during an armed robbery, then the incident must have offense codes of "09A - Murder" and "120 - Robbery", and must have the circumstance code of "08 - Other Serious Crime Involved".

NOTE: (This computer edit works in both directions. If a Murder incident has one or more additional offense codes, then the edit requires a circumstance of "08" By the same token, if a Murder incident has a circumstance code of "08", then the edit requires that at least one additional offense code be entered besides "09A - Murder".)

 

09 - Other Known Circumstances - Assaults or homicides in which the facts ARE KNOWN to law enforcement, but which do not fit any of the other categories in this table.

 

10 - Unknown Circumstances - Assaults or homicides in which investigators CAN NOT determine ANY suspected cause for the crime. Use of this code should be rare.

 

11 - Institutional - Aggravated assaults or homicides committed inside local, state, or federal correctional or mental facilities, in which the inmates are committed by law and not free to leave.

 

12 - Drive-by/Sniper - Assaults or homicides which are committed from ambush, hiding places, moving vehicles, etc. These circumstances usually involve firearms or some weapon which can injure at a distance. The are sometimes – but not always – associated with Drug Dealing. The simple fact that the victim and offender are lovers does not necessarily mean that this circumstance code should be used, since lovers could be arguing about money, not their relationship.

 

 

11-9

 

Murder and Aggravated Assault Circumstances, continued

 

 

Example 1: Two rival youth street gangs argued over "turf" rights to sell drugs and one of the gang members was killed. Involved are "Argument"; "Drug Dealing"; and "Youth Gang" circumstances. While all threeapply, only two circumstances can be reported. Therefore, the two most descriptive categories (in the judgment of the reporting agency) should be used.In this case, they would be "03 - Drug Dealing" and "05 - Youth Gang".

 

Example 2: A drug dealer is robbed and murdered by one of his customers during a drug selling transaction. The circumstance is "03- Drug Dealing".

 

Example 3: A husband and wife argue about discrepancies in the check book. They mutually assault each other. During the fight, the husband knocks the wife to the floor, where she hits her head on a table and dies. The circumstance is "01 - Argument".

 

Example 4: A husband and wife argue about a transaction in the check book which shows a payment to a local florist. The wife suspects that the man has a girlfriend, calls her by name, and accuses the husband of adultery. They argue more, then come to blows. The wife grabs a kitchen knife and stabs the husband, who dies. The circumstance is "06 - Lovers' Quarrel".

 

Example 5: A child is abducted from a shopping mall parking lot, taken to a wooded area, sodomized, and killed. The circumstance is"08 - Other Serious Crime Involved". (The offense codes required in this incident are "09A - Murder", "100 - Kidnapping/Abduction", and "11B - Forcible Sodomy".)

 

Example 6: A store owner is killed during a robbery. The circumstance is "08 - Other Serious Crime Involved". (The offense codes are "09A - Murder", and "120 - Robbery".)

 

Example 7: A father becomes "tired of" paying for clothes and food for his baby son. He suffocates the child. The circumstance is "09 - Other Known Circumstances". (The reason for the murder is known, but does not fit any of the other specific categories.)

 

 

 

11-10

 

Murder and Aggravated Assault Circumstances, continued

 

Example 8: The body of an unidentified male victim has been found in a ditch, shot three times in the head. Your investigation is unable to determine the identity of the victim, or any suspected motive for the murder. Basically, nothing is known about the reason the victim was killed. The circumstance is "10 - Unknown Circumstances". (If additional investigation later determines a motive, then the circumstance code must be updated to reflectthe new circumstance.)

 

Example 9: A prisoner at a county prison is murdered by another inmate in an argument over food. The circumstance codes are "11 - Institutional", and "01 - Argument".

 

Example 10: A drug dealer hires a man to ride by a rival dealer's home and fire a rifle into it in order to "scare him out of my territory". The rival dealer is at home when the man drives by and fires the shots. He is wounded, and dies. The circumstances are "03 - Drug Dealing", and"12 - Drive-by/Sniper".

 

 

 

 

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER CIRCUMSTANCES

 

Select one (1) of the following for each Negligent Manslaughter victim:

 

30 - Child Playing With Weapon

 

31 - Gun-Cleaning Accident

 

32 - Hunting Accident

 

33 - Other Negligent Weapon Handling

 

34 - Other Negligent Killings

 

 

 

11-11

 

Negligent Manslaughter Circumstances, continued

 

Example: A father, while unloading his shotgun in the house, shoots and kills his six-year-old son. Your agency's investigation finds the shooting to be accidental. Code as "33 - Other Negligent Weapon Handling".

 

NOTE: Traffic fatalities, deaths of victims due to their own negligence, and accidental deaths not caused by criminal negligence, ARE NOT included as Negligent Manslaughters for the SCIBRS program. Prosecutiveaction should not determine the classification of these offenses.

 

NOTE: If your agency wishes to collect information on traffic deaths, etc., your vendor or programmer must provide you with specialin-house codes which will not be submitted to SCIBRS.

 

 

 

JUSTIFIABLE HOMICIDE and

JUSTIFIABLE AGGRAVATED ASSAULT CIRCUMSTANCES

 

NOTE: The South Carolina SCIBRS program, unlike the national NIBRS program, collects data on "Justifiable Aggravated Assaults". As stated in the definitions in another partof this manual, a Justifiable Aggravated Assault meets all the same criteriaas a Justifiable Homicide, except that the victim is not dead. These justifiable assaults involve the use of deadly force only against perpetrators duringthe commission of serious criminal events. They are not meant to collect information in situations involving less than deadly force. Justifiable Aggravated Assaults are to be coded in exactly the same manner as Justifiable Homicides (except that the offense code is 13A).

 

Select one (1) of the following for each Justifiable Homicide or Justifiable Aggravated Assault victim:

 

20 - Criminal Justifiably Killed or Assaulted by Private Citizen

 

21 - Criminal Justifiably Killed or Assaulted by Police Officer

 

 

 

11-12

 

Justifiable Homicide and Justifiable Agg. Assault Circumstances, continued

 

 

Example 1: While robbing a store, the subject is shot and killed by the store owner. This is a Justifiable Homicide (09C). Code the circumstance as "20 - Criminal Justifiably Killed by Private Citizen".

 

Example 2: In resisting arrest, a fugitive pulled a gun and fired twice at the two officers attempting the apprehension. Neither officer was hit, but both returned fire, killing the fugitive. This is a Justifiable Homicide (09C). Code it as "21 - Criminal Justifiably Killed by Police Officer".

 

Example 3: A police officer responds to a domestic disturbance. Upon arriving at the scene, he is attacked by a man with a knife. The officer shoots the subject twice. The subject is transported to the hospital and survives. This is a Justifiable Aggravated Assault (13A). Code itas "21 - Criminal Justifiably Assaulted by Police Officer".

 

 

ADDITIONAL JUSTIFIABLE HOMICIDE and

JUSTIFIABLE AGGRAVATED ASSAULT CIRCUMSTANCES

 

To further describe the circumstances of a justifiable homicide, enter one (1) of the following:

 

A - Criminal Attacked Police Officer and That Officer Killed/Wounded Criminal

B - Criminal Attacked Police Officer and Criminal Killed/Wounded by Another Police Officer

C - Criminal Attacked a Civilian

D - Criminal Attempted Flight From a Crime

E - Criminal Killed/ Wounded in Commission of a Crime

F - Criminal Resisted Arrest

G - Unable to Determine/ Not Enough Information

 

 

 

11-13

 

TYPE OF INJURY

The offenses for which Type of Injury are to be reported are:

 

Kidnapping/Abduction

Forcible Rape

Forcible Sodomy

Sexual Assault With An Object

Forcible Fondling

Robbery

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Extortion/Blackmail

 

 

To describe the type(s) of bodily injury suffered as a result of these offenses, report up to five (5) of the following injury types for each victim (Individual):

 

N - None

B - Apparent Broken Bones

I - Possible Internal Injuries (expected to be serious)

L - Severe Laceration (medical aid reasonably expected)

M - Apparent Minor Injury (medical aid not indicated)

O - Other Major Injury (medical aid reasonably expected)

T - Loss of Teeth

U - Unconsciousness (knocked out; NOT simply fainting)

 

 

NOTE: "M - Apparent Minor Injury" can NOT be used with any other injury code. "N - None" can NOT be used with any other injury code.

 

For purposes of reporting to the SCIBRS system, initial estimates of the seriousness of an injury may be made using an officer's experience and common sense in most cases. Injury codes are NOT expected to be official medical diagnoses. In many cases, emergency medical personnel at the scene or at the hospital can assist in evaluating injuries.

 

 

11-14

 

Type of Injury, continued

 

Example (1): An offender assaulted a man with a tire iron, breaking the victim's arm and opening a cut about 3 inches long and 1 inch deep on his back. The injuries should be coded as "B - Apparent Broken Bones" and "L - Severe Laceration."

Example (2): The victim, a respected public figure, was blackmailed regarding his sexual activities. He suffered no physical injury. The injury code will be "N - None".

 

 

 

OFFENDER NUMBER(S) TO BE RELATED

The Offender Number is used to link Victims to Offender data and Relationship data (see Relationships below) in violent crimes. This number is the same as the "Offender Sequence Number" explained later in this manual.

For each violent crime victim, assign a sequence number from "01" to "10" for up to 10 of the offenders involved. If there are more than 10 offenders, select those that are "closest" in relationship to the victim.

If nothing is known about the perpetrators (no age or sex or race information), enter "00."

 

NOTE: These SAME Offender Numbers must be used as Offender Sequence Numbers to identify these same offenders in the Offender section, as explained later in this manual.

Use these Offender Numbers to link the Relationship data below to each Victim of one of the offenses listed:

 

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter

Negligent Homicide

Justifiable Homicide

Kidnapping/Abduction

Forcible Rape

Forcible Sodomy

Sexual Assault With An Object

Forcible Fondling

Robbery

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Intimidation

Incest

Statutory Rape

Sexual Exposure

 

Example: If Victim 01 is to be related to Offender 01, then enter Offender

Number "01".

 

 

11-15

 

 

RELATIONSHIP OF VICTIM TO OFFENDER

If the incident has one or more of the offenses listed below, then the Relationship of each Victim TO each Offender must be coded.

 

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter

Negligent Homicide

Justifiable Homicide

Kidnapping/Abduction

Forcible Rape

Forcible Sodomy

Sexual Assault With An Object

Forcible Fondling

Robbery

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Intimidation

Incest

Statutory Rape

Sexual Exposure

 

 

Using the offender numbers assigned as noted above, enter the Relationship of each Victim TO each Offender.

 

NOTE: The MOST SPECIFIC Relationship code MUST be used.

Example: Most people who know each other by name might be considered "Acquaintances", but, if they are "fishing buddies", the correct Relationship would be "Friend".

Example: A worker and his boss might be considered "Acquaintances", but the correct Relationships for them would be "Employee" and "Employer".

It is REQUIRED that these distinctions be made in coding Relationships. The use of "Other Family", "Acquaintance", "Otherwise Known", or"Unknown" as catch-alls will disqualify an agency from participating in the SCIBRS program.

 

 

11-16

 

Relationship of Victim to Offender, continued

 

 

 

NOTE: The "direction" of each relationship must be maintained. The definition of this data element is "Relationship of Victim TO Offenders". This indicates a "direction" for each Relationship of the Victim TO the Offenders. In other words, how does the victim of the crime relate to the offender in the crime? NOT the other way around.

Example: A father shoots his son, the Relationship MUST be "Child" (NOT "Parent"!), since the relationship of the Victim TO the Offender is that the "Victim was Child" to the Offender.

 

 

 

11-17

 

Relationship of Victim to Offenders, continued

 

 

Relationships to be used are:

 

Within The Family

Victim Was:

SE - Spouse

CS - Common-Law Spouse

PA - Parent

SB - Sibling (brother or sister)

CH - Child

GP - Grandparent

GC - Grandchild

IL - In-law

SP - Stepparent

SC - Stepchild

SS - Stepsibling (stepbrother or stepsister)

OF - Other Family Member

 

Outside Family But Known to Victim

Victim Was:

AQ – Acquaintance (Do not use AQ as a catch-all. Be specific for FR, NE, BG, HR, EE, etc.)

FR - Friend

NE - Neighbor

BE - Babysittee (the baby)

BG - Boyfriend/Girlfriend

CF - Child of Boyfriend/Girlfriend

HR - Homosexual Relationship

XS - Ex-Spouse

EE - Employee

ER - Employer

OK - Victim Was Otherwise Known

 

Not Known By Victim

ST - Victim Was Stranger (Your investigation shows that they are Known to be Strangers)

RU - Relationship Unknown (No Relationship can be determined by your investigation)

Other

VO - Victim Was Offender (Mutual attacks in which a clear distinction can not be made as to who is the Victim and who is the Offender. The "Victims" in the incident are also "Offenders".

 

 

11-18

 

Relationship of Victim to Offenders, continued

 

NOTE: The "direction" of the relationship MUST be that of "the Victim TO the Offender". For example, if a grandmother is assaulted by her grandson, the Relationship of the Victim (the grandmother) TO the Offender (the grandson) is "GP - Grandparent" (NOT the other way around!).

 

NOTE: The most specific Relationship available MUST be used. "Catch-all" categories such as "Other Family", "Acquaintance", "Otherwise Known", and "Unknown" must not be used if more specific Relationships are available.

Example: One neighbor assaults another. The Relationship MUST be "NE - Neighbor" (NOT "AQ - Acquaintance").

Example: One "regular fishing buddy" assaults another, the Relationship MUST be "FR - Friend" (NOT "AQ - Acquaintance").

Example: A male Offender rapes a female Victim who he has been dating for six months, the Relationship MUST be "BG - Boyfriend/ Girlfriend" (NOT "AQ -

Acquaintance"!)

The use of specific Relationships is a REQUIREMENT for participation in the SCIBRS program.

 

NOTE: The Relationship "VO - Victim Was Offender" is to be used in cases where all of the participants in the incidents were both "Victims" AND "Offenders" of the same offense. That is, in those situations in which there are mutual attacks and there is no clear distinction between who is a victim and who is an offender.

Example: Domestic disputes where both husband and wife are charged with assault; double murders (i.e., two people kill each other); or barroom brawls where many participants are arrested.

 

NOTE: The Relationships "ST - Stranger" and "RU - Unknown" are often used interchangeably. A clear distinction MUST be madebetween these two categories.

"ST - Victim was Stranger" means that the officer is reporting that the Victim DID NOT KNOW the Offender. (This is NOT the same as "Unknown".)

"RU - Relationship Unknown" means that the officer is reporting that he/she CAN NOT determine what the relationship of the Victim to the Offender might be. The nature of their relationship is NOT KNOWN to the reporting officer. (This is NOT the same as "Stranger".)

 

 

11-19

 

Relationship of Victim to Offenders, continued

 

Examples:

1. A store owner is robbed by a man whose face he could see clearly. The store owner says that he has never seen the man before. The relationship is "Stranger".

2. A store owner is murdered during a robbery. There are no witnesses and no leads. The relationship of the victim to the killer is "Unknown" at this time. (Future investigation may turn up a suspect, and a specific relationship such as "Acquaintance" or "Stranger" can then be entered.)

3. A woman is raped by her cousin. The relationship is "OF – Other Family Member".

4. A baby is severely beaten by the mother's boyfriend. The relationship is "CF - Child of Boyfriend/Girlfriend".

5. A female worker is forcibly fondled by her boss. The relationship is "EE - Employee" (NOT "Employer", NOT "Acquaintance").

6. Two men are living together and are sexually involved with each other. One man strikes the other with a baseball bat during an argument. The relationship is "HR - Homosexual Relationship" (NOT "Acquaintances").

7. An officer responds to a domestic dispute. He finds that the husband and wife are both bleeding from their noses. Each claims that the other was the aggressor, and the officer is unable to determine whether there is clearly an offender in the incident. Therefore, both parties are listed as Victims, and both parties are listed as Offenders. In this incident, the relationships must be both "SE - Spouse" AND "VO - Victim is Offender". This isaccomplished by giving one party a Victim Sequence Number of 001 and that SAMEparty an Offender Sequence Number of 01. The other party is given Victim Sequence Number 002 and also Offender Sequence Number 02. Schematically, it would look like:

Victim Offender Relationship
001 01 VO
001 02 SE
002 02 VO
002 01 SE

 

 

 

11-20

 

LEOKA DATA (Law Enforcement Officers Killed/Assaulted)

There are two data elements required to describe assaults and murders in which police officers are the victims. They are "LEOKA Type Activity" and "LEOKA Type Assignment", and MUST be used whenever a law enforcement officer s the victim of any of the following offenses:

 

Aggravated Assault

Simple Assault

Murder & Non-negligent Manslaughter

 

 

LEOKA TYPE ACTIVITY (Police Assaults)

Report the type of activity the police officer was handling at the time of the assault or homicide. Chose the one code that best describes the incident.

Applicable codes for this field are:

A - Responding to Disturbance(family quarrels, man with gun, etc.)

B - Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects

C - Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects

D - Attempting other arrests

E - Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience)

F - Handling, transporting prisoners

G - Investigating suspicious persons

H - Ambush - no warning

I - Offender mentally deranged (suspected)

J - Traffic stops, pursuits

K - All other activity

 

LEOKA TYPE ASSIGNMENT

Report the type of assignment the police officer was on at the time of the assault or homicide. Chose the one code which best describes the assignment.

Applicable codes are:

1 - Two-man vehicle

2 - One-man vehicle, alone

3 - One-man vehicle, assisted by another law enforcement officer

4 - Detective or special assignment, alone

5 - Detective or special assignment, assisted by another law enforcement officer

6 - Other, alone

7 - Other, assisted by another law enforcement officer

 

("Other" includes walking patrol, horse patrol, water patrol, undercover, etc.)

 

 

 

 

11-21

 

LEOKA, continued

 

 

NOTE: ALL assaults on law enforcement officers MUST be reported, even if there was no injury to the officer.

Minor assaults MUST be reported if they were the result of a direct attack on an officer.

Pointing and Presenting a Firearm or any threatened use of a dangerous weapon is considered an Aggravated Assault under SCIBRS definitions.

(Resisting arrest may sometimes be coded as an officer assault, IF the officer is struck, kicked, bitten, etc.).

This information is of great value to the S.C. Criminal Justice Academy in designing their officer safety courses for police officers.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

11-22

 

 

 

 

SECTION 12

OFFENDER DATA

 

 

 

 

OFFENDER DATA

 

For purposes of SCIBRS, the "Offender" is the person who is believed or known to have committed a crime. Offenders are often called "subjects", "suspects", "perpetrators", etc.

Offender data include the characteristics (age, sex, and race) of each offender involved in a crime incident, even though an arrest may not have been made. The object is to capture ANY information known to law enforcement concerning the offenders even though they may not have been identified.

There are, of course, instances where no information about perpetrators is known.

 

 

OFFENDER (SEQUENCE) NUMBER

Each offender in the incident is to be assigned a sequence number from "01" to "99." A separate set of offender data is to be submitted for each numbered offender. If nothing is known about the offender(s), report "00."

 

Example (1): A corpse with five bullet holes in it was found in an abandoned warehouse. There were no witnesses to the crime, and nosuspects. "00" should be entered as the only offender sequence number. No other offender data is required, because nothing at all is known about the offender(s), not even how many there were.

 

Example (2): Two offenders were seen fleeing the scene of a burglary, but because they were wearing ski masks and gloves, their age, sex, and race could not be determined. In this case, two sets of offender datawould be recorded – one with sequence number "01" and the other with "02", each with appropriate "unknown" codes for age, sex, and race (see below).

 

 

12-1

 

AGE OF OFFENDER

The age of each numbered offender is to be reported either as an exact number of years, a range of years, or as unknown. Enter one of the following:

 

01 to 98 Years Old - report the exact age

99 - Over 98 Years Old

00 - Unknown Age (Must NOT be used if the subject has been identified or if a witness has had a good look at him/her.)

 

Age Range - Should the exact age be unknown, an age range can be reported. Any range in years is acceptable as long as it is reasonable. For example, for a teenager the entry might be "13 to 19." However, an age range from "10 to 90" is not reasonable, and should be entered as "00 – Unknown". These ranges should beuseful law enforcement information.

 

Example: A robbery victim described his assailant, who escaped, as in his "mid-twenties." The entry might be "24 to 26" years old.

 

NOTE: Your agency's software should allow you to enter an age greater than "99" if necessary; if so, the age should be automatically converted to "99" when the record is sent to SCIBRS. Be certain that your software performs this function.

 

 

 

SEX OF OFFENDER

The sex of the offender is to be indicated:

 

M - Male

F - Female

U - Unknown (Must NOT be used if the offender has been identified or if a witness had a good look at him/her.)

 

Example: A female was seen shoplifting but escaped the scene with merchandise. The sex would be "F - Female."

 

 

12-2

 

RACE OF OFFENDER

The race of the offender is to be indicated as one of the following:

 

W - White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. (Persons who are sometimes very loosely referred to as "Mexican", "Cuban", or"Latino" are usually coded as White. However, see "HispanicEthnic Origin" on the nect page.)

B - Black - A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa, south of the Sahara Desert.

I - American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who maintainscultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

A - Asian or Pacific Islander - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, but is not limited to, China, India, Pakistan, Japan, Korea, Viet Nam, the Philippine Islands, and Samoa.

U - Unknown - Should rarely be used if an offender has been identified, or if a witness had a good look at him/her.

 

NOTE: Many persons consider themselves to be part of more than one racial category. Officers should be sensitive to the concerns and desires of individuals, but should also make every reasonable effort to place a person in one of the first four categories, above, using experience and common sense. (Common experience seems to indicate that most people consider themselves to be members of some easily identifiable racial group, even though their family histories may include individuals from more than one race. A rule of thumb is to describe someone as if you were issuing a BOLO.)

"Unknown" should be used very rarely, but may infrequently be used in unusual situations.

Skin color alone does not place a person in one of these categories. An effort should be made to place a person in one of the groupings,based upon the guidelines given above.

 

Example: A white female was seen shoplifting but escaped the scene with merchandise. Enter "W - White."

Example: A man from India is a suspect in a murder. Enter "A - Asian or Pacific Islander".

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

12-3

 

 

 

 

SECTION 13

ARRESTEE DATA

 

 

 

 

ARRESTEE DATA

(GROUPS A & B)

 

1. Arrestee data are to be reported for all persons apprehended for the commission of Group A or Group B crimes.

 

2. The object of this data set is to collect data on persons arrested, NOT on charges filed.

For example, a person may be arrested on several charges in connection with a single incident; in this situation, only one set of arrestee data will be reported.

(A person may also be arrested one time in connection with two or more separate incidents. See "Multiple Clearance Indicator" instructions, below.)

 

3. One person may be arrested many separate times for violations within a jurisdiction. If each arrest was an individual apprehension(that is, the subject was apprehended "on the street" each time), a set of arrestee data is to be reported for each separate arrest.

Travelling to another jurisdiction to take custody of a person already in their jail also counts as an "on the street" arrest, and a setof arrestee data is reported.

 

NOTE: Serving additional warrants on a person already in YOUR jail is handled as a "Multiple Clearance". See later in this segment.

 

4. The arrestee data to be reported describe the arrestee (i.e., his/her age, sex, race, and ethnicity) and the circumstances of the arrest. Data are to be entered for each of the arrestees involved in each incident (up to 99). If there were no arrestees, no report is required.

Group A crime incidents will automatically be cleared upon the receipt of the first set of data for any arrestee connected with an incident.

 

 

13-1

 

WHEN TO REPORT ARRESTEES

Record arrest data on all persons processed by arrest, apprehension, warrant service, or Uniform Traffic Ticket for committing offenseswithin the reporting jurisdiction, regardless of whether the offense is of a minor or serious nature (except routine traffic citations).

 

Also include:

1. Those persons arrested and released without a formal charge being placed against them. (An arrest has occurred when a law enforcement officer detains an adult with the intention of seeking charges against the person for a specific offense and a record is made of the detention.)

2. Juveniles TAKEN INTO CUSTODY but merely warned and released without being charged. (NOTE: This "custody" situation isdifferent from the "no custody" exceptional clearance situation.)

3. Persons cited for criminal offenses (not routine traffic offenses) and "released at the scene" after being issued a S.C. Uniform Traffic Ticket and County/Municipal Uniform Ordinance Summons. Local SCIBRS systems MUST incorporate these arrests into their monthly submissions, AS REQUIRED BY STATE STATUTE .

UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKETS and COUNTY/MUNICIPAL UNIFORM ORDINANCE SUMMONS (Non-custodial Arrests): As specified by South Carolina statutes 56-7-10 and 56-7-80, ALL arrests effected through the use of the S.C. Uniform Traffic Ticket MUST be reported to the SCIBRS program (except "routine" traffic; see item 9, above).

Many agencies believe that non-custodial arrests in which defendants are released at the scene do not need to be reported to SCIBRS.State law, however, requires that they be submitted.

Additionally, any agency not reporting these arrests will be lowering its arrest counts, while neighboring jurisdictions will be showing them, giving an incorrect picture of law enforcement actions for the agency which fails to report.

 

 

 

ARRESTS FOR OTHER AGENCIES

Data on persons taken into custody as "assists" to other jurisdictions MUST NOT be reported to SCIBRS by your agency. The agency for which the arrest was made, that is, the jurisdiction where the offense occurred, will report the arrestee data, and duplication in reporting will be avoided.

Your agency will report any arrests made for you by other jurisdictions.

Your agency may want to keep a record of such "assists" you make for other agencies. If so, get your programmer/vendor to perform the appropriate programming to allow you to capture the data locally, but NOT forward it to SLED. NOTE: DO NOT use any of the NIBRS codes in this manual for this purpose.

 

 

 

 

13-2

 

NOTE ON GROUP B ARREST REPORTS (Level 7 Records)

Because of the different natures of Group A and Group B offenses, not all details required for Group A Incident (and Arrest) Reports are needed for Group B Arrest Reports. As previously stated, for the SCIBRS andNIBRS programs, ONLY arrestee data are submitted for Group B crimes. Your department will likely keep incident data on most Group B offenses, but only arrest data may be forwarded to SCIBRS.

 

NOTE: Each data element shown on the following pages has a notation indicating whether it applies to Group A or Group B arrests.

 

 

13-3

 

ARRESTEE DATA

(GROUPS A & B)

 

 

ARRESTEE SEQUENCE NUMBER

(Groups A & B)

Each arrestee reported in a Group A Incident (Arrest) Report or a Group B Arrest Report is to be assigned a sequence number from 01 to99.

Example: If two persons were arrested for the commission of a robbery, one arrestee would be numbered as "01" and the other "02."

 

 

ARREST TRANSACTION NUMBER (INCIDENT NUMBER, CASE NUMBER, OCA)

(Groups A & B)

This number is the SAME as the one reported for the Incident Number (Case Number, OCA). It is assigned by the reporting agency and is used to identify the arrest and link it with the rest of the incident. The number may be up to 12 characters in length. Data about two or more arrestees can be reported under the same Arrest Transaction Number (Case Number) if they are all linked to that incident.

 

 

ARREST DATE

(Groups A & B)

The month, day, and year the arrest took place are to be reported.

 

 

13-4

 

TYPE OF ARREST

(Groups A & B)

Describe the type of apprehension at the time of initial contact with the arrestee, by selecting one of the following:

 

O - On-View Arrest - Taken into custody without a warrant or previous incident report. The officer usually arrives while the crime is in progress, or very shortly after the incident occurred.

 

S - Summoned/Cited - NOT taken into custody . "Released at the scene" using a S.C. Uniform Traffic Ticket or County/ Municipal Uniform Ordinance Summons, as required by statutes 56-7-10 and 56-7-80.

 

T - Taken Into Custody - Taken into custody based on a warrant or a previously submitted incident report. The officer or the department is usually aware that the subject is being sought for arrest because of pre-existing documentation.

 

 

Example (1): A female was arrested while in the act of soliciting for prostitution on a street corner. The Type of Arrest would be "O - On-View Arrest."

 

Example (2): A man was issued a Uniform Traffic Ticket for a magistrate's court case, and is released at the scene by the officer. An arrest must be reported to the SCIBRS system. The Type of Arrest would be "S - Summoned/Cited."

 

Example (3): A suspect is taken into custody as the result of a complaint being filed, an investigation being conducted, or a warrant being issued. The Type of Arrest should be "T - Taken Into Custody."

 

 

 

NOTE: This information must be available to officers at the booking site.

 

 

 

13-5

 

MULTIPLE CLEARANCE INDICATOR (MCI)

(Group A Only) (NOTE: FBI calls this Multiple Arrestee Segments Indicator.)

Assures that an arrestee is counted appropriately, and that all cases linked to that person are cleared.

All Group A arrestee records must have one of the following MCI codes:

 

N - No Multiple Clearance:

This arrestee clears only ONE incident. There are NO OTHER CASES TO BE CLEARED BY THIS ARRESTEE.

 

C – More Than One Incident to be Cleared:

This arrestee will clear MULTIPLE cases. His arrestee data will be linked to more than one incident. "C" must be used only one time for this arrestee. Other arrestee segments for this individual in other incidents get an "M".

(This code tells the system that there is MORE THAN ONE CASE TO BE CLEARED BY THIS ARREST. The arrestee record which is given code "C" should be entered into the FIRST of the multiple incidents which you will be clearing. Once you have entered the arrestee record into the FIRST incident using a "C", you must enter it again into all of the remaining incidents to be cleared, using an "M"; see below. A simple rule is that if a "C" is used for the arrestee in the first incident, then an "M" must be used in all other incidents cleared by this arrestee.)

 

M - Multiple Cases Cleared:

This arrestee will clear MULTIPLE incidents. After entering this person’s arrestee segment using a "C" on the first incident, enter his arrestee segment into all other incidents to which he is linked, using "M".

 

 

Example 1: John Smith is arrested for committing one burglary, incident case number 97-001. He is connected to no other crimes. Smith's arrestee record is entered into incident 97-001 using MCI code "N" (meaning, count the arrest; there are no other cases cleared).

Example 2: Jones and Johnson are arrested for committing one burglary, incident case number 97-002. They are connected to no other crimes. The individual arrestee records for Jones and Johnson are both entered into incident 97-002 using MCI code "N" (meaning, count these arrests; there are no other cases cleared).

Example 3: Jones is arrested for committing two burglaries, incident case numbers 97-011 and 97-022. His arrestee record must be entered into BOTH incidents in order to clear them both. Jones' arrestee record is entered into the first incident, 97-011 using MCI code "C" (meaning, clear this case AND count the arrest); Jones' arrestee record must also be entered into incident 97-022 using MCI code "M" (meaning, clear this case, but do not count the arrest again).

Example 4: Smith, Taylor, and James are arrested for committing three burglaries, incident case numbers 97-033, 97-044, and 97-055. The individual arrestee records for Smith, Taylor, and James must be entered into all three incidents in order to clear all of them. The arrestee records for all three men must be entered into incident 97-033 using MCI code "C" (meaning, clear this case AND count these three arrests); the individual arrestee records for all three men must also be entered into cases 97-044 and 97-055 using MCI code "M" each time (meaning, clear this case, but do not count these arrests again).

 

 

13-6

MCI, continued

 

Schematically, Example 4 might look like this:

 

Case # 97-033 Offense, Burglary
Arrestee S. Smith, W/M 21 Charge, Burglary MCI - C
Arrestee T. Taylor, W/M 25 Charge, Burglary MCI - C
Arrestee J. James, W/M 30 Charge, Burglary MCI - C
Case # 97-044 Offense, Burglary
Arrestee S. Smith, W/M 21 Charge, Burglary MCI - M
Arrestee T. Taylor, W/M 25 Charge, Burglary MCI - M
Arrestee J. James, W/M 30 Charge, Burglary MCI - M

Case # 97-055 Offense, Burglary
Arrestee S. Smith, W/M 21 Charge, Burglary MCI - M
Arrestee T. Taylor, W/M 25 Charge, Burglary MCI - M
Arrestee J. James, W/M 30 Charge, Burglary MCI - M

 

The counts coming out of this example will be:

Three offenses of burglary;

Three burglaries cleared by arrest;

Three arrests for burglary.

 

(This Example 4 also demonstrates why your software should be able to automatically send an individual's arrestee record to more than one incident, or should allow you to save the arrestee record and move it to more than one incident. If your software has this feature, then the situation illustrated above becomes a very simple matter to enter. If you do not have this feature, then it becomes a time-consuming, but necessary operation. In Example 4, you would not want to spend time entering each arrestee record three times - especially since your system would likely require names, addresses, DOB,next of kin, aliases, etc.)

 

 

 

NOTE; SERVING WARRANTS ON ARRESTEES STILL IN JAIL: The error most often committed in applying MCI codes concerns the serving of ADDITIONAL warrants against a person who is CURRENTLY in jail. If a person is arrested, charged and jailed, an arrestee record is entered with the appropriate MCI codes, as explained above. If that person remains in jail for a period of time,and additional warrants are served on him linking him to other cases, then the situation MUST treated as a MULTIPLE CLEARANCE situation. Arrestee records entered as a result of additional warrants served on a person who has already been arrested, but not released, MUST be entered using MCI code "M – Multiple Cases Cleared". These warrant services on arrestees not yet released from jail MUST NOT be treated as "new" arrests. To do so is a violation of system guidelines.

(Additionally, if the arrestee was originally entered with an MCI of "N – No Multiple Clearance", then that original MCI must be modified to "C – More than one incident to be cleared".)

 

 

13-7

MCI, continued

 

Example 1: Bill Jones is arrested and charged in two robbery cases, incident case numbers 97-0066 and 97-0077. An arrestee record for Jones is entered for 97-0066 using MCI code "C – More than one incident to be cleared", and another is entered for 97-0077 using MCI code "M - Multiple Clearance".

However, Jones is unable to post bond, and remains in jail. While Jones is in jail, he is served with an additional warrant charging him with another robbery, incident case number 97-0099. This is case is not a "new"arrest, but it is an additional case "cleared by arrest". It is handled byentering an arrestee record for Jones into incident case number 97-0099 using MCI code "M - Multiple Clearance".

 

The arrest of Jones, therefore, ends up with one arrest and three cases cleared.

 

Example 2: John Williams is arrested and charged in one incident of burglary, incident case number 97-1111. An arrestee record for Williams is entered for 97-1111 using MCI code "N - No Multiple Clearance" (since he is linked to only one case at this time).

However, Williams is unable to post bond, and remains in jail. While Williams is still in jail, he is served with another warrant charging him with burglary in incident case number 97-2222. This is not a "new"arrest, but it is an additional case "cleared by arrest". It is handled slightly differently from Example 1.

In this situation, Williams' original arrestee record was entered with an "N", since, at that time, his arrest was only linked to one incident. However, when the warrant was served on him in jail, the situation became a multiple clearance situation.

It is handled by changing the original MCI code in case number 97-1111 from the "N" (no multiple clearance) to a "C" – More than one incident to be cleared", and then entering an arrestee record for Williams into incident case number 97-2222 using an MCI code of "M - Multiple Clearance".

The arrest of Williams, therefore, ends with one arrest and two cases cleared by arrest.

(The basic difference between these two examples is that, in Example 1, Jones already had an MCI code of "C", which did not have to be changed when additional warrants were served. However, in Example 2, Williams' original arrest cleared only one case, and was entered with MCI code "N", and in order to make the MCI coding reflect the actual picture, the original arrestee record had to be changed to a "C".)

 

 

13-8

MCI, continued

MCI, General Information

The "Multiple Clearance Indicator" (MCI) ensures that an arrestee is counted only one time for each individual apprehension, and that all cases linked to that person are cleared. A basic rule of UCR and SCIBRS (since about 1930) states that only ONE arrest is counted for each apprehension - that is, ONE arrestee count for each time a person is arrested "off the street". This rule remains in force regardless of the number of charges filed against an individual, orthe number of cases cleared by the arrest.

The use of the "Multiple Clearance Indicator" codes will assure that each agency is properly credited with all appropriate arrest counts,and at the same time will assure that all cases linked to the arrestee are "cleared by arrest".

The guidelines given in this section MUST be followed exactly in order for an agency to participate in the SCIBRS and NIBRS programs. This means that the person(s) responsible for entering the MCI codes MUST be in a position which enables him/her to know which cases are to be cleared by thearrest of any person or group of people.

NOTE: This information is usually available ONLY to persons working in the Records/Case File section, or to previously assigned investigating officers and detectives.

Jailors and dispatchers in most agencies usually DO NOT have the information available to apply the MCI codes! DO NOT allow these codes to be entered by personnel who have no way of knowing which cases are to be cleared! Accurate entry of MCI data is a requirement for participation in the SCIBRS program.

It is strongly suggested that only Records personnel or previously assigned investigating officers or detectives be authorized to assignMCI codes.

 

NOTE: In the SCIBRS systems, a Group A arrestee record with MCI MUST be entered for each Group A incident report it is linked to.

For example: Joe Smith is arrested for committing three burglaries, cases numbers 97-0001, 97-0011, and 97-0022. Smith's arrestee record MUST be entered into EACH of these three incident records in order to clear them. The appropriate MCI code MUST be entered with each arrestee record.

 

 

13-9

MCI, continued

 

NOTE: The SCIBRS system can count an incident as "cleared by arrest" ONLY if the incident record contains at least one arrestee record. This means that the arrestee record of EACH person MUST be entered intoEACH incident to which that person is linked by arrest. Some software has afunction which allows the user to send the arrestee record to all incidents it is linked to, or which allows a user to save and transport arrestee records to several incidents. This function becomes important when you have one or more arrestees linked to several incidents. You do not want to have to re-enter all of the datain a person's entire arrestee record several times. If your softwaredoes not contain such a procedure, you should contact your vendor right away.

 

 

 

13-10

 

 

IBR ARREST OFFENSE CODE

(Groups A & B)

The three-digit SCIBRS Offense Codes describing the offenses for which the arrestee was apprehended is to be reported. There are 68possible codes, as the perpetrator may have been arrested for any of the 53 Group A offenses or any of the 15 Group B crime categories. These offenses and codes are listed elsewhere in this manual.

 

MULTIPLE OFFENSE CODES

Often, there is only one crime classification involved in an arrest. However, if the arrestee was apprehended for more than one offense, then the reporting agency MUST determine which was the most serious offense and report it as the FIRST arrest offense code. It is very important that the most serious offense code be entered as the FIRST offense code in an arrestee record. The FBI allows only one offense code per arrestee record, and the code you enter in the FIRST position is the offense code which goes to the national program. Similarly, the SCIBRS reports generated for your agency use the FIRSToffense code for your monthly and annual arrest counts. (Arrest counts for the other offense codes can be generated at your request, butthe routine monthly and annual reports use only the FIRST code.) For example, if you enter an arrestee record for a man charged with both Murder and Public Drunk, the Murder MUST be entered in the FIRST position, or both the national and state programs will publish an arrest count for Public Drunk ratherthan Murder for your department.

 

NOTE: The Offense Lookup Table in this manual may be used cautiously as a general guide in determining the offense code for an arrest charge. It is ONLY a general guide, and MUST NOT be used as a direct conversion table. It may also be used cautiously as a general guide in determining whether an offense is a Group A or Group B offense.

 

 

 

NOTE TO PROGRAMMERS and DATA ENTRY: Group A or Group B offense codes may be entered for Group A arrestee records (Level 6 arrestee segment).

However, Group A offense codes may NOT be entered for Group B arrestee records (Level 7 arrestee segment).

 

 

 

13-11

 

CONVERTING ARREST OFFENSE CODES FROM STATUTES NOT ALLOWED

The direct conversion of state statutes, NCIC codes, or any other codes to SCIBRS codes is not allowed. Any software which makes such conversions will not be certified to submit data to SCIBRS.

 

NOTE: MANY ARREST CHARGES REQUIRE A COMPARISON TO THE ORIGINAL INCIDENT BEFORE DETERMINING WHICH ARREST CODES TO APPLY: Many arrest charges, because they are written in state statutory language, will REQUIRE you to know how the original incident was coded BEFORE you apply an arrest offense code. This procedure is required for participation in the SCIBRS program.

 

Many state statutory offenses can not be directly converted to SCIBRS codes. (This is the main reason that the SCIBRS program will not allow a computer to convert statutory orNCIC codes to SCIBRS codes.) For this reason, many arrest offense codes must be determined by looking to see how the original incident was coded.

For example, if you compare the S.C. statutory definition of

"Criminal Sexual Conduct" (1st, 2nd , or 3rd degree)

to the SCIBRS definitions of Sex Offenses, "Criminal Sexual Conduct" can correspond to the SCIBRS definitions for

Forcible Rape (11A),

Forcible Sodomy (11B),

Sexual Assault with an Object (11C), or possibly others.

 

Also, the statutory definition of

"Criminal Domestic Violence" (1st, 2 nd, or 3rd degree)

can correspond to the SCIBRS definitions for

Aggravated Assault (13A),

Simple Assault (13B),

Intimidation (13C), or possibly others.

 

 

 

13-12

 

Converting from Statutes Not Allowed, continued

 

 

The statute commonly called

"Breaking into Motor Vehicles" ("B & E Auto", "Auto Breaking", etc.)

can correspond to the SCIBRS definitions for

Motor Vehicle Theft - Attempted (240),

Larceny - Theft from a Motor Vehicle (23F),

Larceny - Theft of Motor Vehicle Parts & Accessories (23G),

Vandalism (290), or possibly others.

 

 

The South Carolina SCIBRS program REQUIRES that data entry personnel determine the original incident's SCIBRS offense codes before entering codes for any of the following arrest charges. Computer conversions are NOT allowed; there MUST be human intervention.The personnel performing the arrest offense code entries MUST be ina position to determine what the original incident offense was (jailers and booking officers are frequently not in a position to know what the original codewas, so in these situations, there must be intervention at some point by records personnel or investigating officers.).

 

 

The following state statutory arrest categories MUST NOT be given arrest offense codes UNTIL the entering person has determined what the ORIGINAL incident offense code was. The arrest codes must then be entered to MATCH the original incident code.

 

Criminal Sexual Conduct (any degree)

Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor (any degree)

Criminal Domestic Violence (any degree)

B & E of Auto, Auto Breaking

Stalking

Pointing and Presenting a Firearm

(This list may be expanded, based on input from law enforcement. Watch for updates.)

 

 

 

 

13-13

 

Converting from Statutes Not Allowed, continued

 

 

NOTE: DO NOT code all "Criminal Sexual Conduct" arrests as the SCIBRS offense "Forcible Rape - 11A"; other codes may apply;

DO NOT code "Criminal Domestic Violence" as "All Other Offenses - 90Z";

DO NOT code "B & E Auto" as "Burglary - 220";

DO NOT code "Stalking" as "All Other Offenses - 90Z".

DO NOT code "Pointing and Presenting a Firearm as "Weapons Violations - 520".

You must determine what the original incident code was, and use the same code for the arrest.

 

 

 

ARRESTEE WAS ARMED WITH

(Groups A & B)

Indicate whether the arrestee was armed with a COMMONLY KNOWN WEAPON at the time of his/her apprehension. A "commonly known weapon" is an object that can be clearly understood to be a manufactured weapon. Examples are:

Firearms

Knives

Martial arts weapons

Clubs, blackjacks

Objects clearly altered to be used as dangerous weapons.

NOTE: DO NOT enter "Weapons of opportunity" such as bottles, sticks, ice picks, axes, rocks, or other common items which arenot clearly manufactured or altered to be dangerous weapons. Such weapons ofopportunity can be coded in the incident report offense segment, when appropriate (e.g. for police officers assaulted), but NOT in the arrestee record.

 

 

Up to two (2) weapons can be reported for each arrestee.

01 - Unarmed

11 - Firearm, type unknown

12 - Handgun

13 - Rifle

14 - Shotgun

15 - Other Firearm - type known, but no code given here

16 - Lethal Cutting Instrument - e.g., switchblade knife

17 - Club, Blackjack, Brass Knuckles, etc.

 

 

 

13-14

 

Arrestee Was Armed With, continued

Automatic/Semi-Automatic Firearm Indicator

If the firearm was fully automatic or semi-automatic, enter one of the codes below:

 

A = Fully Automatic Firearm:

If the weapon is a fully automatic firearm, an "A" is to be coded with the weapon type. A "fully automatic firearm" is defined as any firearm which shoots, or is designed to shoot, more than one shot at a time by asingle pull of the trigger.

 

S = Semi-automatic Firearm:

If the weapon is a semi-automatic firearm, an "S" is to be coded with the weapon type. A "semi-automatic firearm" is defined as any firearm which fires one shot with each pull of the trigger and automatically reloads itself without manual intervention. This category does not include revolvers, bolt actions, pumps, etc.

 

 

Example (1): When apprehended, an arrestee had in his possession a .357 Magnum revolver. The revolver should be reported as "12 - Handgun".

 

Example (2): A suspect resisted arrest using a broken liquor bottle and a pool stick as weapons before being subdued. The weapon code must be "01 -Unarmed", since these were "weapons of opportunity". (In this example, the bottle and pool stick would be reported as weapons on the incident report offense record, but not on the arrestee record, since they are not manufactured to be commonly known weapons.)

 

Example (3): An arrestee was armed with a military version of the M-16 rifle, which can produce fully automatic fire (much like a machine gun). The weapon code must be "13A", which means "Rifle, Fully Automatic".

 

Example (4): An arrestee was armed with an S & W Model 59 pistol, which can produce semi-automatic fire. The weapon code must be "12S", which means "Handgun, Semi-automatic".

 

 

13-15

 

Arrestee Was Armed With, continued

 

 

Example (5): An arrestee is carrying a belt knife when he is apprehended. Since belt knives are of varying sizes, and some are legal in one jurisdiction, but not legal in a neighboring jurisdiction, an officer must exercise judgement in deciding whether the arrestee is armed or unarmed. The totality of the circumstances must be considered. Is the knife legal? Has the knife been used in a crime? As well as other factors. The codefor this kind of weapon will depend upon the officers' knowledge and experience.

 

Example (6): An arrestee is arrested while carrying a baseball bat. The weapon code must be "01 - Unarmed".

 

Example (7): An arrestee is arrested while carrying a baseball bat which has been altered by cutting eight inches from its top, filling it with six inches of lead, and taping the grips. The weapon code must be "17 - Club", since a common item has been clearly altered to be used as a dangerous weapon.

 

 

NOTE TO ARRESTING OFFICERS:

If the booking officer is a jailer, or some person other than the arresting officer, then that person may not know whether the arrestee was armed, or how he or she was armed. Arresting officers must clearly pass this information on to the booking personnel.

Records, booking, ordata entry personnel are sometimes not familiar with firearms. Therefore, it is your responsibility to make appropriate notations which will tell them whether a firearm is Fully Automatic, Semi-automatic, or neither. For example, some administrative personnel may not know that an S & W Model 36 is a revolver, while an S & W Model 59 is a semi-automatic pistol. They may alsonot know that a Remington 1100 is a semi-automatic shotgun. Whenever describing the weapon for an arrest or incident, always state clearly whether itis a handgun, rifle, shotgun, etc., and whether it is a semi-automatic firearm, a fully automatic firearm, or neither. Use common language – not nomenclature. Any detailed information, such as make, model, serial number, etc. can go in the officer’s narrative report or other appropriate place.

 

This is one of the most important pieces of information for officer safety and survival. It assists theS.C. Criminal Justice Academy in designing its courses, and helps justify modern equipment for officers in your department.

 

 

 

13-16

 

AGE OF ARRESTEE

(Groups A & B)

The age of the arrestee is to be reported either as an exact number of years, a range of years, or as unknown. Record one of the following:

01 to 98 Years Old - report the exact age.

99 - Over 98 Years Old (Your software may allow you to enter exact ages for persons over 99 years old. If so, you must be certain that your software converts the age to 99 before sending it to SCIBRS.)

00 - Unknown (A valid code for NIBRS, but SHOULD NOT be used for a person in custody, since a reasonable age range can always be estimated.)

NOTE: Age ranges are acceptable for persons whose exact age can not be determined. However, the age range must be reasonable. For example, an age range of 20-30 years old is reasonable; a range of 15-85 years old is not reasonable. An age range should rarely be used for arrestees, since the person is in custody.

 

 

SEX OF ARRESTEE

(Groups A & B)

The sex of the arrestee is to be indicated:

M - Male

F - Female

"Unknown" cannot be reported for the sex of an arrestee.

 

 

 

RACE OF ARRESTEE

(Groups A & B)

Use one of the following to indicate the race of the arrestee:

W - White - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. (Persons who are sometimes very loosely referred to as "Mexican", "Cuban", or"Latino" are usually classified as "White". However, see "Ethnic Origin of Arrestee" on the following page.)

 

B - Black - A person having origins in any of the Black racial groups of Africa, south of the Sahara Desert.

 

I - American Indian or Alaskan Native - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who maintainscultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition.

 

A - Asian or Pacific Islander - A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands. This area includes, but is not limited to, China, India, Pakistan, Japan, Korea, Viet Nam, the Philippine Islands, Hawaii, and Samoa.

 

U - Unknown - "Unknown" should rarely be used, since the person is in custody.

13-17

 

NOTE: Many persons consider themselves to be part of more than one racial category. Officers should be sensitive to the concerns and desires of individuals, but should also make every reasonable effort to place persons in one of the first four categories, above, using experience and common sense. (Common experience seems to indicate that most people consider themselves to be members of some easily identifiable racial group, even though their family histories may include individuals from more than one of the categories given above. A rule of thumb is to describe a person just as you would if you were issuing a BOLO .)

"Unknown" should be used very rarely, but may infrequently be used in unusual situations.

 

 

 

ETHNIC ORIGIN OF ARRESTEE

(Groups A & B)

For each arrestee, the ethnic origin is to be recorded as one of the following:

 

H – Hispanic Ethnic Origin - A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin, REGARDLESS of RACE.

N - Not of Hispanic Ethnic Origin

U - Unknown

 

 

NOTE: A person of Hispanic Ethnic Origin may be of ANY Race; W, B, I, or A.

"Hispanic", "Latino", "Cuban" or "Mexican" are NOT race categories. Persons of Hispanic Ethnic Origin may be of any race.

An arrestee's Race (W, B, I, A) must be coded FIRST; then choose an Ethnic Origin code.

The categories of "Race" and "Ethnicity" are NOT interchangeable.

For example one arrestee, who is White, may be of Hispanic ethnic origin, while a second arrestee, who is Black, may ALSO be of Hispanic ethnic origin.

As in determining a person's race, experience and common sense should be used in a reasonable effort to determine a person's Ethnic Origin.

 

 

13-18

 

 

RESIDENT STATUS OF ARRESTEE

Each arrestee must show a resident status code in order to indicate the arrestee's residency in relation to the location of the arrest. The categories are:

 

J - (Jurisdiction) - The arrestee is a resident of THIS JURISDICTION, (where the crime occurred);

S - (State) - The arrestee is a resident of S.C., but NOT a resident of your jurisdiction;

O - (Outside) - The arrestee's residence is OUTSIDE South Carolina.

U - (Unknown) - The arrestee's residency can not be determined.

 

 

County and State law enforcement agencies should base their determinations of residency on the town, city, or community where the crime occurred rather than their broader geographical jurisdictions.

 

 

Examples 1-2: Jones, the arrestee, resides in the city of Greenville, in Greenville County, in the state of South Carolina;

1. Jones is arrested in the city of Greenville, and the Greenville City Police Department makes the arrest report. The Resident Status code will be "J" (meaning that he lives in the jurisdiction where the crime occurred).

2. Jones is arrested in Greenville County, but not inside a city limit. The Greenville County Sheriff's Department is the primary law enforcement agency for un-incorporated areas in the county, and for towns which have no organized police forces. The Sheriff's Office makes the arrest report. The Resident Status code will be "S" (meaning that he lives in S.C., but that he is a resident of another generally recognized law enforcement jurisdiction).

Example 3. Smith is a resident of Dallas, Texas. He is arrested in the city of Camden, S.C. The Camden City Police Department makes the arrest report. The Resident Status code will be "O" (meaning that he lives outside the state of South Carolina).

Example 4. A person is arrested, but police are unable to determine his identity or residency. The Resident Status code will be"U" (meaning that it can not be determined where the person lived).

 

 

13-19

 

 

DISPOSITION OF ARRESTEE UNDER 18

(Groups A & B)

The age "Under 18" (or "17 and Under") is a national FBI standard, and is not meant to conform to state juvenile age statutes.

The information to be reported in this category relates to the law enforcement disposition of persons age 17 or younger who are taken into custody or arrested. In certain situations, depending upon the seriousnessof the offense as well as other factors, young offenders may be takeninto custody by law enforcement, but then released to parents, guardians, or other relatives without being actually charged. Since they are taken into custody, they are reported as "arrests" for SCIBRS purposes. In other situations, even very young offenders may taken into custody, charged, jailed, turned over to DJJ, or referred to Family Court or Circuit Court. These are also considered as "arrests" for SCIBRS purposes.

The word "arrest" as it applies to juveniles in the SCIBRS program is intended to mean that law enforcement took a juvenile into custody, REGARDLESS of whether the juvenile was warned and released, or was actuallycharged or referred. Juveniles who have committed crimes and are taken into custody under such circumstances that, if the juvenile were an adult, an arrest would have been reported, are counted as "arrested" in the SCIBRS program. Arrestee segments are to be entered for these juveniles.

Police "contacts" with juveniles where no offense has been committed and instances wherein juveniles are taken into custody for their own protection will not be reported as arrests.

 

One of the following codes is to be reported for all arrestees under 18 years of age (17 and younger):

 

H - Handled Within Department - taken into custody, but

released to parents, guardians, etc.; released with warning

R - Referred to Other Authorities - taken into custody and

turned over to Family Court, PPP, DJJ, welfare agency, other

police agency, General Sessions Court, incarcerated, etc.

 

 

Example (1): The arrestee, age 13, is taken into custody for vandalizing a school, but is released to his parents with a warning.The code would be "H - Handled Within Department."

 

Example (2): The arrestee, age 14, is arrested for murder, and is placed in jail to await a hearing. The code would be "R - Referred to Other Authorities."

 

NOTE: In SC, persons who are 17 years old are usually handled as adults by law enforcement. Experience indicates that most or all 17 year olds will have the code "R".

 

 

13-20

 

DRUG ARRESTS

The South Carolina SCIBRS Program, in order to produce the degree of detail needed in drug arrest reporting, has found it necessary to REQUIRE the following two data elements, "Drug Arrest Type Activity" and "Drug Arrest Drug Description", and to also REQUIRE that the codes be entered by human intervention, NOT by derivation or bybeing automatically moved from other segments of an incident report. Again, these codes must not be imputed from other data in the incident; they must be entered by a human user.

 

NOTE TO PROGRAMMERS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT: These two data elements MAY NOT be derived, imputed, or brought forward from the Offense Segment ("Type Criminal Activity") or the Property Segment ("Drug Description"). While the code tables here are the same as in those segments, here the codes MUST be entered by a human being who is aware of the actual drug charges placed against each person arrested. Deriving, imputing, or bringing forward any of these codes based upon earlier activity and drug codes is not permitted by the SCIBRS system (and will defeat the ability to capture this important information in adequate detail). (The reason behind this requirement is that the activity and drug codes given earlierin the incident describe a drug offense in a general way for the entire incident. The most serious drug charge against each person arrested can only bedetermined by the person entering the arrestee information. For more discussion, you may write or telephone the South Carolina SCIBRS Program.)

 

 

DRUG ARREST TYPE ACTIVITY

Use one of the following codes in conjunction with one drug code to describe the one most serious drug charge against an arrestee:

B - Buying/Receiving

C - Cultivating/Manufacturing/Publishing

D - Distributing/Selling (NOTE: includes PWID)

E - Exploiting Children

O - Operating/Promoting/Assisting

P - Possessing/Concealing (NOTE: includes Simple Possession)

T - Transporting/Transmitting/Importing

U - Using/Consuming

 

 

 

 

13-21

 

 

 

 

DRUG ARREST TYPE DRUG

Use one of the following drug codes in conjunction with one activity code to describe the one most serious drug charge against an arrestee:

A - Crack Cocaine

B - Cocaine (not Crack)

E - Marijuana

C - Hashish

D - Heroin

F - Morphine

G - Opium

H - Other Narcotics (Codeine, Demerol, Methadone, etc.)

I - LSD

J - PCP

K - Other Hallucinogens (BMDA, DMT, Peyote, STP, etc.)

L - Amphetamines/ Methamphetamines

M - Other Stimulants (Benzedrine, Preludin, Ritalin, etc.)

N - Barbiturates

O - Other Depressants (Quaalude, Doriden, Glutethimide, etc.)

P - Other Drugs (Antidepressants, Aromatic Hydrocarbons,

Darvon, Librium, Valium, etc.)

U - Unknown Type Drug

 

Example 1. A person is charged with "Simple Possession of Marijuana";

Drug Arrest Type Activity = P
Drug Arrest Type Drug = E.

 

Example 2. A person is charged with "Possession With Intent to Distribute
Crack Cocaine";

Drug Arrest Type Activity = D
Drug Arrest Type Drug = A.

 

Example 3. A person is charged with "Sale of Heroin";

Drug Arrest Type Activity = D
Drug Arrest Type Drug = D.

 

 

13-22

 

WINDOW ARRESTS

Arrests which are linked to incident reports which are older than the current calendar year plus the previous calendar year ("current year minus one") MUST be entered as "Window" arrests. Your software should be programmed to automatically check theincidents linked by case number to all Group A arrests to see if the originalincident is older than "current year minus one". If the incident is older than "current year minus one", then your software should automatically send the arrest to SLED as a "W" record. You will want to be sure that your vendor or programmer has included this feature, or you will lose many arrests and clearances.

A more detailed discussion of "Window" records is found elsewhere in this manual.

IT IS REQUIRED THAT YOUR SOFTWARE BE PROGRAMMED TO PERFORM THIS FUNCTION.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

13-23

 

 

 

 

SECTION 14

COMMON QUESTIONS

 

 

 

POINTS TO REMEMBER ABOUT AUTOMATED NIBRS/SCIBRS SUBMISSION

 

 

1. CRIMES ARE CLASSIFIED (NAMED) ACCORDING TO UCR DEFINITION, NOT STATE

STATUTE.

 

2. ALL ATTEMPTED CRIMES ARE COUNTED.

 

3. THE FINDINGS OF COURTS, JURIES, CORONERS, ETC., ARE NOT CONSIDERED IN IN

UCR CLASSIFICATION. ONLY POLICE FINDINGS, AS DEFINED BY UCR DEFINITIONS ARE

CONSIDERED.

 

4. MULTIPLE OFFENSES ARE COLLECTED IN A SINGLE INCIDENT IN ORDER TO GIVE

MORE DETAIL ABOUT THAT INCIDENT. CRIME RATES ARE STILL CALCULATED THE SAME

AS THEY HAVE BEEN FOR 50 YEARS; THAT IS, ONLY THE SINGLE MOST SERIOUS CRIME

CODE IN AN INCIDENT IS ACTUALLY COUNTED IN PUBLISHED CRIME RATES; ALL

ADDITIONAL CODES ARE USED TO PREVENT THE LOSS OF DETAIL THAT WAS A

CHARACTERISTIC OF THE OLD UCR PROGRAM. (SO, CRIME RATES DO NOT "SKYROCKET"

UNDER NIBRS, AS SOME DEPARTMENTS HAD FEARED.)

 

5. AGENCIES SENDING AUTOMATED NIBRS/SCIBRS DATA TO SLED MUST SUBMIT ALL

GROUP A INCIDENTS, NOT JUST THE ABBREVIATED LIST THAT THEY SENT WHEN THEY

WERE SENDING PAPER. (THE ELIMINATION OF SOME GROUP A PAPER SUBMISSIONS WAS

A TEMPORARY MEASURE TAKEN IN RESPONSE TO A RIF AT SLED. EVEN PAPER AGENCIES

WILL BEGIN AGAIN SENDING ALL GROUP A CRIMES AT SOME POINT IN THE FUTURE.)

 

6. AN AGENCY SENDING AUTOMATED DATA TO SLED MUST AGREE TO HAVE A SMALL

GROUP OF SUPERVISORY OR ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL WHO WILL PERFORM 100%

QUALITY CONTROL ON ALL CODED DATA SENT TO SLED. THESE PEOPLE MUST BE

TRAINED BY SLED OR A TRAINER APPROVED BY SLED.

 

7. THERE WILL BE A 3-MONTH PARALLEL TEST BETWEEN SLED AND ANY AGENCY

DESIRING TO SEND AUTOMATED DATA. AUTOMATED SUBMISSION CAN ONLY BE PERFORMED

USING SOFTWARE THAT HAS BEEN TESTED AND APPROVED BY SLED. (NEW VENDORS CAN

CONTACT SLED/UCR FOR SPECIFICATIONS.)

 

 

14-1

 

COMMON MISUNDERSTANDINGS

 

 

AUTOMATED CONVERSION from state statutes, NCIC codes, or any other codes to SCIBRScodes IS NOT ALLOWED. Agencies using a computer program which convertsstatutory codes, NCIC codes, local codes, or ANY OTHER codes to SCIBRS codes are disqualified from participating in the automated submission of UCR data to the state and national programs.

 

STATE STATUTES must NOT be used as the basis for SCIBRS offense coding. As explained in the manual, the use of SCIBRS offense definitions is REQUIRED for participation in the SCIBRS programs at the state and national levels. All participating agencies must use the uniform definitions found in the manual.

 

ALL ARRESTS (except those noted below), both Group A and Group B are reported to the state SCIBRS program, including arrests made using the SC Uniform Traffic Ticket and the County/Municipal Uniform Ordinance Summons.

 

DO NOT REPORT:

Bench Warrants

Mental Commitment Papers

Traffic arrests (except DUI, Vehicle Homicides, Hit & Run w/Injury, Failure to Stop for Blue Light)

Arrests for Other Agencies

Property You Recover for Other Agencies

Assisting Other Agencies (if the crime was outside your jurisdiction)

(These kinds of events MUST NOT be reported as "90Z".) (Your programmer/vendor will need to create special codes or other methods for your agency to collect this information. It can not be sent to the state or national programs.)

 

UNIFORM TRAFFIC TICKET ARRESTS and COUNTY/MUNICIPAL UNIFORM ORDINANCE SUMMONS MUST be reported to the SCIBRS system if the arrest is for a NON-TRAFFIC offense. It is common practice for some agencies torelease subjects on the scene after issuing a S.C. Uniform Traffic Ticket or County/Municipal Summons for a minor criminal violation. State law requires that these arrests be reported to SLED. (Also, the failure to report such arrests cheats your agency out of arrest counts which are being reported by neighboring jurisdictions.)

 

 

14-2

 

WINDOW RECORDS are ARRESTS, RECOVERIES, and EXCEPTIONAL CLEARANCES which are associated with your cases which are OLDER than "current year minus one". These records must be sent to SLED with an "Action Code" of "W". Your software MUST be programmed tohandle Window records. Your programmer can contact SLED DP with questions.

 

RELATIONSHIPS must be stated in the "direction" of Victim TO Offender. In other words, what is the relationship of the victim TO the offender (NOT the other way around).

A common problem in coding relationships is the mis-use of "Stranger" and "Relationship Unknown". Some officers incorrectly use these two codes interchangeably.

"ST - Stranger" means that the reporting officer has determined that the victim was a stranger to the offender.

"RU - Relationship Unknown" means that the reporting officer was UNABLE TO DETERMINE the relationship of the victim to the offender.

 

Relationships must be as specific as possible. "Acquaintance", "Other", "Other Family", and "Unknown" MUST NOT be used as "catch-all" categories.

 

 

 

Back to Table of Content

 

 

 

 

14-3

 

 

 

 

SECTION 15

OFFENSE LOOKUP TABLE

 

 

NOT TO BE USED AS A CONVERSION TABLE

 

 

 

 

OFFENSE LOOKUP TABLE

 

NOTE: NOT TO BE USED AS A CONVERSION TABLE !

 

It is with a great deal of reservation that this table is provided. Its use has been greatly misunderstood. It is provided here simply because it is a common element of theNIBRS and SCIBRS program manuals, and because many other state programs provide it. It is NOT to be used as a direct conversion table. It is IMPOSSIBLE to directly convert most state criminal codes and NCIC codes to SCIBRS codes.)

 

The offense lookup table was compiled as a general guide to assist in determining whether a crime is a Group A or Group B offense. This is an important distinction because administrative, offense, property, victim, offender, and arrest information is to be reported for Group A crimes, and only arrest data are recorded for Group Boffenses. If your software is properly programmed, it should make the distinctions between Groups A & B automatically, so that you do not need this table.

The table MUST NOT be used to determine what offenses were involved in a criminal incident. Such a determination must have already been made. After the offenses have been classified, the table may be used to ascertain whether the offenses are within Group A or Group B (however, your software should do this for you). The table does not include all of the offenses which can possibly occur. Therefore, it must be used with caution only as a "general guide".

Various types of crimeshave been listed in the lookup table, followed first by whether they are within Group A or Group B and next by the applicable SCIBRS crime category. Forexample, the crime of "Abduction" is listed as a Group A offense covered by the crime category "Kidnapping- Abduction." Your software should automatically determine whether a crime code is a Group A or Group B offense.

Traffic offenses (e.g., parking and moving violations) are not to be reported except for Driving Under the Influence, Hit and Run (with injury), Failure to Stop for a Blue Light, and Reckless Homicide.

 

 

15-1

 

TABLE FORMAT: OFFENSE/ GROUP A or B /SCIBRS OFFENSE

 

 

- A -

Abandonment/B/Family Offense, Nonviolent

Abduction/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Abortion/B/All Other Offenses

Abuse, Nonviolent/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Accessory Before the Fact/A or B/All Other Offenses (if Group A offense

involved) or applicable Group B offense (if Group B offense involved)

Accosting B All Other Offenses

Adulterated Food, Drugs, or Cosmetics/B/All Other Offenses

Adultery/B/All Other Offenses

Affray/B/Disorderly Conduct

Aiding and Abetting/B/All Other Offenses (if Group A offense involved) or

applicable Group B offense (if Group B offense involved)

Aiding Prisoner to Escape/B/All Other Offenses

Air Piracy-Hijacking/A/Kidnapping-Abduction; Robbery; etc.

Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Laws/B/Liquor Law Violations

Antitrust Law Violations/B/All Other Offenses

Arson/A/Arson

Assault/A/Assault Offenses

Assault, Aggravated/A/Assault Offenses

Assault and Battery/A/Assault Offenses

Assault, Minor/A/Assault Offenses

Assault, Sexual/A/(Classify as Forcible Rape, Sodomy, or Fondling; Sexual

Assault With An Object; or Statutory Rape)

Assault, Simple/A/Assault Offenses

Assembly, Unlawful/B/All Other Offenses

Automatic Teller Machine Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Auto Breaking, B&E of Auto/A/Attempted Motor Vehicle Theft, Larceny From a

Motor Vehicle, Larceny of Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories, Vandalism

 

- B -

Bad Checks/B/Bad Checks

Battery/A/Assault Offenses

Begging/B/Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations

Bestiality/B/All Other Offenses

Betting, Unlawful/A/Gambling Offenses

Bigamy/B/All Other Offenses

Blackmail/A/Extortion-Blackmail

Blasphemy/B/Disorderly Conduct

Blue Law Violations/B/All Other Offenses

Boating Law Violation/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-2

 

"B", continued

 

Bomb Threat/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Bombing Offenses/A/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g., Homicide;

Aggravated or Simple Assault; Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property;

Weapon Law Violations)

Bookmaking/A/Gambling Offenses

Breach of Contract/A/Fraud Offenses

Breach of Peace/B/Disorderly Conduct

Breach of Trust/A/Embezzlement, Fraud Offenses

Breaking and Entering (B&E)/A/Burglary-B&E

Breaking into an Automobile/A/Attempted Motor Vehicle Theft, Larceny From a

Motor Vehicle, Larceny of Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories, Vandalism

Bribery/A/Bribery

Bribery, Sports/A/Gambling Offenses (Sports Tampering)

Buggery (Consensual Sodomy)/B/All Other Offenses

Burglary/A/Burglary-B&E

Burglary Tools, Possessing/B/All Other Offenses

Buying Stolen Property/A/Stolen Property Offenses

 

- C -

Canvassing, Illegal/B/All Other Offenses

Card Game, Unlawful/A/Gambling Offenses

Carrying Concealed Weapon/A/Weapon Law Violations

Checks, Bad/B/Bad Checks

Checks, Fraudulent/B/Bad Checks

Checks, Insufficient Funds/B/Bad Checks

Child Abuse, Nonviolent/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Child Abuse, Violent/A/Assault Offenses

Child Cruelty, Nonviolent/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Child Cruelty, Violent/A/Assault Offenses

Child Molesting/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Child Neglect/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Civil Rights Violations/B/All Other Offenses (Report predicate offenses,

e.g., Arson; Murder; Aggravated Assault)

Combinations in Restraint of Trade/B/All Other Offenses

Commercialized Sex/(Classify as Prostitution Offenses; Pornography-Obscene

Material; or All Other Offenses)

Commercialized Vice/(Classify as Prostitution Offenses; Pornography-Obscene

Material; or All Other Offenses)

Common Drunkard/B/Drunkenness

Compounding a Felony or Misdemeanor/B/All Other Offenses

Computer Crime/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g., Larceny-Theft;

Embezzlement)

Concealed Weapon/A/Weapon Law Violations

 

 

15-3

 

"C", continued

 

Conditional Release Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Confidence Game/A/Fraud Offenses

Conflict of Interest/B/All Other Offenses

Consensual Sodomy/B/All Other Offenses

Conservation (Environment or Ecology) Laws/A or B/All Other Offenses

Conspiracy to Commit/B/All Other Offenses (if Group A offense involved) or

applicable Group B offense (if Group B offense involved)

Contempt of Court/B/All Other Offenses (DO NOT report Bench Warrants)

Contract Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor/B/Contributing to the Delinquency

of a Minor; (other offenses may have been committed, e.g., Pornography-

Obscene Material; Prostitution; Liquor Law Violations; etc.)

Conversion/A or B/Classify as Embezzlement; Trespass of Personal Property,

etc.)

Corrupt Conduct by Juror/B/All Other Offense (Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Bribery; False Statement)

Counterfeiting/A/Counterfeiting-Forgery

Credit Card Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Criminal Defamation/B/All Other Offenses

Criminal Domestic Violence/A/Assault Offenses (13A, 13B, 13C)

Criminal Libel/B/All Other Offenses

Criminal Sexual Conduct/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible or Non-Forcible (11A, 11B,

11C, 11D, 36A, 36B, 36C)

Criminal Slander/B/All Other Offenses

Cruelty to Animals/B/All Other Offenses

Cruelty to Children, Nonviolent/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent; or All Other

Offenses

Cruelty to Children, Violent/A/Assault Offenses

Curfew Violation/B/Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations

 

- D -

Damage Property/A/ Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property

Deception/A/Fraud Offenses

Defamation, Criminal/B/All Other Offenses

Desecrating the Flag/Not a Crime

Desertion/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Destroying Evidence/B/All Other Offenses

Detention, Forcible/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Detention, Unlawful/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Dice Game, Unlawful/A/Gambling Offenses

Disinterment, Unlawful/B/All Other Offenses

Disorderly Conduct/B/Disorderly Conduct ("Public Disorderly Conduct" may be

coded as Drunkenness, if that is the only reason for the charge)

 

 

 

15-4

 

"D", continued

 

Disturbing the Peace/B/Disorderly Conduct

Domestic Violence, Criminal (CDV)/A/Assault Offenses (13A, 13B, 13C)

Driving Under the Influence (DUI)/B/Driving Under the Influence

Driving While Intoxicated (DWI)/B/Driving Under the Influence

Driving with an Unlawful Concentration of Alcohol (DUC)/B/ Driving Under the Influence

Drug Equipment Violations/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Drug Offenses/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Drug Paraphernalia Offenses/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Drunk/B/Drunkenness

Drunk and Disorderly/B/Drunkenness

Drunkard, Common/B/Drunkenness

Drunkard, Habitual/B/Drunkenness

Drunkenness/B/Drunkenness

 

- E -

Eavesdropping/B/All Other Offenses

Ecology Law Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Election Law Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Embezzlement/A/Embezzlement

Entry, Forcible/A/Burglary-B&E

Entry, Nonforcible/A/Burglary-B&E

Entry, Unlawful/A/Burglary-B&E

Environment Law Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Equipment, Drug/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Equipment, Gambling/A/Gambling Offenses

Escape (Flight)/B/All Other Offenses

Espionage/B/All Other Offense (Other offenses may have been committed, e.g.,

Burglary; Larceny-Theft)

Explosives Offenses/A/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g., Homicide;

Aggravated or Simple Assault; Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property;

Weapon Law Violations)

Extortion/A/Extortion-Blackmail

 

- F -

Facilitation of /B/All Other Offenses (if Group A offense involved) or

applicable Group B offense (if Group B offense involved)

Failure to Appear/B/All Other Offenses (DO NOT report Bench Warrants)

False Arrest/B/All Other Offenses

False Citizenship/B/All Other Offenses

False Fire Alarm/B/All Other Offenses

False Pretenses/A/Fraud Offenses

False Report or Statement/A or B/Fraud Offenses or All Other Offenses

False Report or Statement/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-5

 

"F", continued

 

Family Offenses, Nonviolent/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Family Offenses, Violent/A/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g.,

Assault Offenses; Homicide Offenses; Forcible Sex Offenses)

Fire, Suspicious/A/Suspicious Fire

Firearms Violations/A/Weapon Law Violations (other Offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Aggravated Assault; Robbery; Disorderly Conduct)

Fish and Game Law Violations/B/All Other Offenses

Flight to Avoid Confinement, Custody, Giving Testimony, or Prosecution/B/All

Other Offenses

Fondling, Forcible/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Forcible Detention/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Forcible Entry/A/Burglary-B&E

Forcible Rape/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Forgery/A/Counterfeiting-Forgery

Fornication (consensual)/B/All Other Offenses

Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Automatic Teller Machine (ATM)/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Contract/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Mail/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Procurement/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Telephone/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Welfare/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraud, Wire/A/Fraud Offenses

Fraudulent Checks/B/Bad Checks

Frequenting a House of Prostitution/B/All Other Offenses

Fugitive/B/All Other Offenses

 

- G -

Gambling/A/Gambling Offenses

Gambling Devices Offenses/A/Gambling Offenses

Gambling Equipment Offenses/A/Gambling Offenses

Gambling Goods, Possession of/A/Gambling Offenses

Gambling Paraphernalia, Possession of/A/Gambling Offenses

Gaming Offenses/A/Gambling Offenses

 

- H -

Habitual Drunkard/B/ Drunkenness

Harassing Telephone Calls/A/Obscene, Harassing Phone Calls

Harassment/B/All Other Offenses

Harboring/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-6

 

"H", continued

 

Hate Crime/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g., Arson; Assault;

Murder; Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property)

Health and Safety Laws (Adulterated Food, Drugs, or Cosmetics)/B/All Other

Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed, e.g., Homicide;

Aggravated or Simple Assault; Fraud)

Hijacking-Air Piracy/A/Kidnapping-Abduction; Robbery; etc.

Hit and Run (w/injury)/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Driving Under the Influence; Vehicular Manslaughter)

Homicide/A/Homicide Offenses

Homicide, Justifiable/A/Homicide Offenses

Homosexual Act or Conduct/B/All Other Offenses

Homosexual Rape/A/Forcible Sex Offenses (usually 11B, Forcible Sodomy)

Hostage-Taking/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

House of Prostitution, Frequenting a/B/All Other Offenses

House of Prostitution, Operating a/A/Prostitution Offenses

 

- I -

Immigration Law Violations (Illegal Alien Entry; False Citizenship;

Smuggling Alien; etc.)/B/All Other Offenses

Impersonation/A/Fraud Offenses

Incendiary Device Offenses/(Report substantive offenses committed, e.g.,

Arson; Homicide; Aggravated or Simple Assault; Weapon Law Violations;

Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property)

Incest/A/Sex Offenses, Nonforcible

Incorrigible/B/Incorrigible

Indecent Exposure/A or B/All Other Offenses (if it is NOT a sexual act); If

the event is sexual exposure (flashing, etc.) code as Sexual Exposure -36C

Indecent Liberties/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible (Forcible Fondling)

Influence Peddling/A/Bribery

Insufficient Funds Checks/B/Bad Checks

Intimidation/A/Assault Offenses

Intoxicated/B/Drunkenness

Intoxication/B/Drunkenness

Invasion of Privacy/B/All Other Offenses

Involuntary Manslaughter/A/Homicide Offenses (Negligent Manslaughter)

 

- J -

Jury Tampering/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed,

e.g., Bribery; Extortion-Blackmail; Intimidation)

Justifiable Homicide/A/Homicide Offenses

 

 

15-7

 

- K -

Kickback/A/Bribery

Kidnapping/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Kidnapping, Parental/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Killing/A/Homicide Offenses

 

- L -

Larceny/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Libel, Criminal/B/All Other Offenses

Liquor Law Violation/B/Liquor Law Violations

Looting/A/Burglary or Larceny (as appropriate)

Lottery, Unlawful/A/Gambling Offenses

 

- M -

Mail Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Male Rape/A/Forcible Sex Offenses (If male rape of another male, code as

11B, Forcible Sodomy)

Malicious Mischief/A/Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property

Mandatory Release Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Manslaughter, Negligent/A/Homicide Offenses

Manslaughter, Nonnegligent/A/Homicide Offenses

Manslaughter, Vehicular/B/All Other Offenses

Military Law Violations (AWOL; Desertion; etc.)/B/All Other Offenses

Misappropriation/A/Embezzlement

Missing Person/A/Missing Person

Molesting, Child/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Monopoly in Restraint of Trade/B/All Other Offenses

Moonshining/B/Liquor Law Violation

Motor Vehicle Theft/A/Motor Vehicle Theft

Murder/A/Homicide Offenses

 

- N -

Narcotic Offenses/A/ Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Neglect of Family/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Negligent Manslaughter/A/Homicide Offenses

Nonpayment of Alimony/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent; or All Other Offenses

(if treated as Contempt of Court)

Nonsupport/B/Family Offenses, Nonviolent

Numbers/A/Gambling Offenses

 

 

15-8

 

- O -

Obscene Communication/B/All Other Offenses

Obscene Language, Use of/B/Disorderly Conduct

Obscene Material/A/Pornography-Obscene Material

Obscene Telephone Call/A/Obscene, Harassing Phone Calls

Obstructing Criminal Investigation/B/All Other Offenses

Obstructing Justice/B/All Other Offenses

Obstructing Police Officers/B/All Other Offenses

Open Container (Alcohol)/B/Liquor Law Violations

Operating a House of Prostitution/A/Prostitution Offenses

 

- P -

Pandering/A/Prostitution Offenses

Paraphernalia Offenses, Drug/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Paraphernalia Offenses, Gambling/A/Gambling Offenses

Parental Kidnapping/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Parole Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Passing Bad Checks/B/Bad Checks

Patronizing a House of Prostitution/B/All Other Offenses

Patronizing a Prostitute/B/All Other Offenses

Peeping Tom/B/Peeping Tom

Perjury/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed, e.g.,

Bribery)

Perjury, Subornation of/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Bribery; Extortion-Blackmail; Intimidation)

Pickpocket/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Pimping/A/Prostitution Offenses

Pocket-picking/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Pointing and Presenting a Firearm/A/Aggravated Assault

Polygamy/B/All Other Offenses

Pornography/A/Pornography-Obscene Material

Possession of Burglary Tools/B/All Other Offenses

Possession of Drug Equipment/A/Drug-Narcotic Offenses

Possession of Gambling Equipment/A/Gambling Offenses

Possession of Stolen Property/A/Stolen Property Offenses

Privacy, Invasion of/B/All Other Offenses

Probation Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Procurement Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Procuring for Prostitution/A/Prostitution Offenses

Profanity/B/Disorderly Conduct

Prostitution/A/Prostitution Offenses

Prostitution, Soliciting for/A/Prostitution Offenses

Prostitution, Transporting Persons for/A/Prostitution Offenses

 

 

15-9

 

"P", continued

 

 

Prowler/A/Prowler

Public Disorderly Conduct/B/Drunkenness (if that is the only reason for the

charge) or Disorderly Conduct

Public Nuisance/B/Disorderly Conduct

Purse-snatching/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

 

- Q -

Quarantine, Violation of/B/ All Other Offenses

 

- R -

Racketeering Influenced and Corrupt Organization (RICO)/B/All Other Offenses

(Report predicate offenses, e.g., Arson; Aggravated Assault; Extortion;

Blackmail)

Racketeering/(Classify same as substantive offenses, e.g., Bribery;

Extortion-Blackmail; Larceny-Theft Offenses)

Rape (Forcible)/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Rape By Instrumentation/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Rape, Statutory, CSC With a Minor/A/Nonforcible Sex Offenses

Receiving Stolen Property/A/Stolen Property Offenses

Reckless Endangerment/B/All Other Offenses

Reckless Homicide (Vehicular)/B/All Other Offenses

Reckless Operation of Aircraft/B/All Other Offenses

Release Violation, Conditional/B/All Other Offenses

Release Violation, Mandatory/B/All Other Offenses

Resisting Arrest/A/Resisting Arrest or Assault Offenses w/ LEOKA data

Restraint, Unlawful/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Revenue Law Violations/B/All Other Offenses

Riot/B/Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations(Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Arson; Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property)

Robbery/A/Robbery

Rout/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed)

Runaway/B/Runaway

 

- S -

Sabotage/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed, e.g.,

Arson; Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property)

Sanitation Law Violations/B/All Other Offenses

Scalping, Tickets/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-10

 

"S", continued

 

Sedition/B/All Other Offenses

Seduction/B/All Other Offenses

Sex, Commercialized/(Classify as Prostitution Offenses; Pornography-Obscene

Material; or All Other Offenses)

Sex Offenses, Forcible/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Sex Offenses, Nonforcible/A/Sex Offenses, Nonforcible

Sexual Assault With An Object/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Sexual Conduct, Criminal/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible, Non-Forcible (11A, 11B,

11C, 11D, 36A, 36B, 36C)

Shoplifting/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Simple Assault/A/Assault Offenses

Slander, Criminal/B/All Other Offenses

Smuggling Alien/B/All Other Offenses

Smuggling Contraband/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Drug-Narcotic Offenses)

Sodomy, Consensual/B/ All Other Offenses

Sodomy, Forcible/A/Sex Offenses, Forcible

Solicitation to Commit Felony/B/All Other Offenses (if Group A offense

involved) or applicable Group B offense (if Group B offense involved)

Stalking/A/Assault Offense, Usually Intimidation (13C)

Stolen Property-Buying, Receiving, or Possessing/A/ Stolen Property Offenses

Stripping Motor Vehicle/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Strong-arm Robbery/A/Robbery

Subornation of Perjury/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been

committed, e.g., Bribery; Extortion-Blackmail; Intimidation)

Suicide/A/Suicide

Suspicion/(Should not be reported as it is not an "offense")

Suspicious Fire/A/Suspicious Fire

Swindle/A/Fraud Offenses

 

- T -

Tax Law Violation/B/All Other Offenses

Telephone Call, Threatening/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Telephone Calls, Obscene, Harassing/A/Obscene, Harassing Phone Calls

Telephone Calls, Threatening/A/Assault, Intimidation (13C)

Telephone Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Terrorism/(Classify same as substantive offense, e.g., Assault; Destruction-

Damage-Vandalism of Property; Murder)

Theft/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Theft From Building/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Theft From Coin-Operated Machine or Device/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Theft From Motor Vehicle/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Theft of Motor Vehicle/A/Motor Vehicle Theft

 

 

15-11

 

"T", continued

 

Theft of Motor Vehicle Parts or Accessories/A/Larceny-Theft Offenses

Theft of Vehicles or Equipment Other than Motor Vehicles/A/ Larceny-Theft

Offenses

Threatening Behavior/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Threatening Conduct/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Threatening Telephone Call/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Threatening Words or Statement/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Threats/A/Assault Offenses (Intimidation)

Traffic Violations (Do not report except for: Driving Under the Influence,

[DUI]; Driving While Intoxicated [DWI]; Driving with an Unlawful Concentration [DUC]; Hit and Run with Injury; Failure to Stop; or Vehicular Manslaughter)

Transmitting Wagering Information/A/Gambling Offenses

Transporting Persons for Prostitution/A/Prostitution Offenses

Treason/B/All Other Offenses (Other offenses may have been committed, e.g.,

Burglary; Larceny-Theft)

Trespass of Personal Property/B/All Other Offenses

Trespass of Real Property/B/Trespass of Real Property

Truancy/B/Truancy

 

- U -

Unlawful Assembly/B/ Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations

Unlawful Entry/A/Burglary-B&E

Unlawful Restraint/A/Kidnapping-Abduction

Unlicensed Weapon/A/Weapon Law Violations

Unregistered Weapon/A/Weapon Law Violations

Using Motor Vehicle Without Consent/A/Using Motor Vehicle Without Consent

Uttering Bad Checks/B/Bad Checks

 

- V -

Vagabondage/B/ Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations

Vagrancy/B/Curfew-Loitering-Vagrancy Violations

Vandalism/A/Destruction-Damage-Vandalism of Property

Vehicular Manslaughter/A or B/Murder or Negligent Manslaughter (if not

accidental or All Other Offenses (if accidental)

Vice, Commercialized/(Classify as Prostitution Offenses; Pornography-Obscene

Material; or All Other Offenses)

Violation of Quarantine/B/All Other Offenses

Violation of Restraining Order/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-12

 

- W -

Wagering, Unlawful/A/ Gambling Offenses

Weapon, Concealed/A/Weapon Law Violations

Weapon, Unlicensed/A/Weapon Law Violations

Weapon, Unregistered/A/Weapon Law Violations

Weapon Law Violations/A/Weapon Law Violations

Welfare Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Wire Fraud/A/Fraud Offenses

Wiretapping, Illegal/B/All Other Offenses

 

 

15-13

 

GENERAL RULES FOR CLASSIFYING OFFENSES

 

 

IDENTIFYING MULTIPLE OFFENSES

Care should be taken to identify all offenses involved in a particular criminal incident. For example, forcible rape might be accompanied by the crimes of motor vehicle theft and kidnapping. (NOTE: Capturing multiple offenses in a single incident DOES NOT increase your crime rate, since crime rates are determined by using the standard "hierarchy" system in use for decades. That is, for purposes of determining your crime rate, only the single most serious offenseis counted by the state and national SCIBRS programs.)

Care must be taken to ensure that each offense which is coded is a separate, distinct crime and not just a part of another offense.

For example, every robbery includes some type of assault, but because an assault is one of the elements which makes up the SCIBRS definition of the crime of robbery, only the Robbery should be coded. However, if during robbery the victim was forced to engage in sexual relations, both Robbery and Forcible Rape should be coded, as forced sexual intercourse is not an element of the definition of Robbery.

Another example is that of a burglary. For SCIBRS, the definition of Burglary includes theft. Therefore, if an incident reports a break-in and a larceny, code only the Burglary, since the larceny is simply partof the overall definition.

 

 

OFFENSES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY

Offenses prefixed by:

Accessory Before/After the Fact;

Aiding/Abetting;

Conspiracy to Commit;

Solicitation to Commit;

Threat to Commit; Etc.;

are offenses of General Applicability.

If they involve a Group A offense, they should be reported as the Group B

offense "90Z" (All Other Offenses).

If they involve a Group B offense, they should be reported according to

their own Group B offense category.

 

 

 

15-14

 

Offenses of General Applicability, continued

 

Example (1): Three members of a motorcycle gang were arrested for conspiracy to commit murder. Three Group B Arrest Reports should be submitted with the SCIBRS Arrest Offense Code entered as "90Z" (All Other Offense).

Example (2): Five liquor store owners were arrested for conspiring to sell liquor on Sunday. Five Group B Arrest Reports should be submitted with the SCIBRS Arrest Offense Code entered as "90G" (Liquor Law Violations).

 

 

ATTEMPTED OFFENSES

"Attempts to Commit" (i.e., attempted crimes) are to be reported the same as the substantive offense, with "Attempted" indicated on the offense report. (Exception; attempted murders should be reported as Aggravated Assaults.)

Example (1): A witness observed and scared away two unknown teenagers who were trying to set fire to an abandoned building. A GroupA Incident Report should be submitted indicating the SCIBRS Offense Code as"200" (Arson) and that the offense was "Attempted."